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CORDIS - Nowości
01.11.2001

Informacje dotyczące Polski

1. Commissioner Busquin talks to CORDIS News about the importance of promoting women and science

W przygotowaniach do wydarzenia Komisji Eurpejskiej "Badania i płeć", które odbędzie się w Brukseli 8 i 9 listopada, członek Komisji Europejskiej ds. Badań Filip Busquin rozmawiał z Wiadomościami CORDIS o ważności problemu kobiet w nauce i działaniach Komisji w tej dziedzinie.

2. Women and science has 'great momentum', head of unit tells CORDIS News

Nicole Dewandre, dyrektor jednostki ds. kobiet i nauki w Zarządzie Głównym Komisji Europejskiej ds. Badań, powiedziała Wiadomościom CORDIS, że jest prześwaidczona o wielkim momencie w sprawie jej jednostki. Ponad 500 osób uczestniczących w konferencji "Badania i płeć" w Brukseli, 8 i 9 listopada, potwierdza to stwierdzenie.

Różne wiadomości

3. Europe unites for science week 2001

Wiele wydarzeń odbędzie się w ponad 20 europejskich państwach podczas Tygodnia Nauki 2001, od 5 do 11 listopada. Jako część tej inicjatywy, siedem projektów wybranych przez Komisję Europejską będzie organizować wydarzenia w Europie.

4. Patinnova identifies European patent problems - could Denmark solve them?

Wnioski z konferencji z wydarzenia Patinnova 2001, które odbyło się w Cardiff w dniach 15-17 października, wskazują na trwały problem efektywnego patentowania, które pozostaje daleko poza zasięgiem europejskich małych i średnich przedsiębiorstw. Tłumaczenie i koszty agentów sprawiają, że składanie wniosków o patent jest dość drogim biznesem dla małych i średnich firm, a nawet droższym gdy się ich broni.

Programy Unii Europejskiej

5. CORDIS' SME techWeb - facilitating SME participation in European research

CORDIS, Serwis Informacyjny Komisji Europejskiej, prowadzi nowy serwis aby pomóc małym i średnim firmom wziąć udział i odnieść korzyść z badań fundowanych przez Unię.

Wydarzenia, warsztaty, konferencje

6. Explore information resources at 'online information 2001'

Około 300 przedsiębiorstw będzie wystawiać niektóre z najlepszych światowych zasobów informacyjnych, wraz z rozwiązaniami dla zarządzania informacjami, wymiany wiedzy, ePublikowania, zarządzania zawartością, intranetów i ekstranetów, na wydarzeniu "Online information 2001", które odbędzie się w Londynie, od 4 do 6 grudnia 2001.

7. Winners of IST prizes named

Zostało ogłoszonych 20 zwycięzców europejskiej nagrody IT (Technologii Informacyjnych). Zostaną przedstawieni podczas wydarzenia Przyjazne Społeczeństwo Informacyjne 2001, które odbędzie się w Disseldorfie od 3 do 5 grudnia.

Konkursy i oferty Unii Europejskiej

8. Pre-validating alternative methods for testing dental filling materials

Wspólnotowe Centrum Badań Komisji Europejskiej (JRC), ogłosiło konkurs na badanie dopuszczające alternatywną metodę lub metody testowania biozgodności dentystycznych materiałów wypełniająctych.

9. Commission calls for study on implications of numbering, naming and addressing

Zarząd Główny Komisji Europejskiej ds. Społeczeństwa Informacyjnego wydał wcześniejszą informację o konkursie na badanie wpływów na politykę zbieżności w dziedzinie numerowania, nazywania i adresowania.

Informacje dotyczące Polski


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1. Commissioner Busquin talks to CORDIS News about the importance of promoting women and science

Record Control Number : 17553

Date : 2001-10-30

Category : General policy

General Information :

In the run-up the European Commission event 'research and gender' in Brussels on 8 and 9 November, EU Research Commissioner Philippe Busquin spoke to CORDIS News about the importance of the women and science issue and the Commission's activities in this field.

CORDIS News: It appears that the Commission did not reach the 40 per cent target mentioned in the 1999 communication. Why do you think this is and how do you intend to persuade more women to participate in the next Framework programme?

Philippe Busquin: You are right, the Commission did not reach the 40 per cent target that it set itself in 1999 for female membership of advisory bodies. But this is the question of the glass that is half full or half empty. Even compared to the little we knew about the participation of women in the Fourth Framework programme (FP4) , we can see that the participation of women in FP5 has risen dramatically. During the whole period of FP4, women accounted for six per cent of all monitoring panel members. In 2000, the equivalent figure is 30 per cent, and in the monitoring panels for environment, non-nuclear energy, human potential and international cooperation, the 40 per cent target has been met. The newly established European research advisory board (EURAB) comprises 31 per cent of women, to be compared with the 0 per cent or 8 per cent of the earlier advisory bodies such as the Industrial research and development advisory committee (IRDAC) and the European science and technology assembly (ESTA) .

Regarding the expert evaluation panels, for 1999 and 2000, the proportion of women is 22.4 per cent. This is less than 40 per cent, but we should bear in mind that this result was achieved from of a pool of experts where only 16 per cent are women. And there again, there are discrepancies in different areas. In some activities (strategic analysis of specific political issues, public awareness) , the participation of women has been as high as 56 per cent. The ethical review, the small and medium sized enterprise (SME) activities and the Human potential programme involved a significant number of women in 2000: 49, 48 and 37 per cent respectively. In the Quality of life programme, women's participation in expert evaluation panels has risen from 24 per cent in 1999 and 2000 to 35 per cent in 2001.

That being said, if we want to sustain progress across all areas, we need to encourage more women to apply to be evaluators. I am well aware that it may be difficult for women with caring responsibilities to spend a whole week in Brussels. But these evaluation sessions provide a very good overview on the cutting edge of research, on how to submit a proposal, as well as creating networking opportunities with other members of the panels. The evaluation experience is an invaluable opportunity for a researcher to develop a European Union perspective.

CORDIS News: What is your reaction to the results of the 'gender impact assessment studies', to be presented at the conference on 8 and 9 November?

PB: It is striking to see that the gender dimension seems to have a propensity to be invisible. Even when relevant, it is not taken into account. These studies converge in showing that there is a tendency to forget about gender when it is not explicitly monitored. The Commission needs to integrate concern for gender equality into each phase of the implementation cycle. This does not mean putting gender everywhere, but ensuring that it is taken into consideration when needed. I was also impressed by the link made in these studies between gender and diversity. Introducing gender into the analysis leads to the opening up of broad categories, such as the young, users, citizens, and households. It also brings into consideration the differences in behaviours, interests, and needs within these groups, instead of considering them as homogeneous entities. It challenges the scientific rhetoric, which aims to describe reality in terms of universal principles. More will be said at the conference, but on the whole these studies are very challenging. We will look very carefully at the recommendations and at integrating them into the next Framework programme. I want to congratulate all the colleagues involved in the studies. I know a great deal of effort was involved but this work represents an important tool for raising awareness in DG Research.

CORDIS News: In which areas has the most progress been made and which areas are still lagging behind? What action is the Commission taking to get women involved in under-represented fields?

PB: The Commission targets its activities across all fields of research. The 'area' question is difficult. It refers to horizontal segregation, i.e. there are more women in biology and medicine than in engineering. It is a policy objective to reduce horizontal segregation and encourage women to enter fields where they are under-represented. On the other hand, it is recognised that the vertical segregation occurs across all areas. Hence, at the top of the hierarchy, the percentage of women is dramatically lower than the equivalent percentage in the pool at the start of their career. Vertical segregation is also a policy concern. We are developing indicators to monitor these two forms of segregation, horizontal and vertical, as well as their interactions. These indicators are not yet available at European Union level however. The policy objective is to produce gender equality in research across all disciplines and levels.

CORDIS News: How can the Commission influence Member States' national approaches?

PB: The Commission, with the Helsinki Group on women and science, aims to provide Member States with a forum to exchange experience, build indicators and benchmarks, and tools to foster cooperation on this issue among Member States. The European Union dimension should allow each Member State to strengthen its own action, on the basis of the lessons learned in the European Union context from the other Member States. The associated countries are also members of the Helsinki Group. This allows us to include the promotion of women in science from an enlargement perspective. We are going to launch a platform for networks of women scientists in order to support the efforts of these networks in shaping research policy. Last but not least, by setting up expert groups the Commission is providing a tool to develop common strategic analysis and recommendations for all stakeholders. This has been the case with the now well known ETAN report (science policies in the European Union: promoting excellence through mainstreaming gender equality) , and will be applied to two new issues that require further analysis and development: the situation of women scientists in the private sector, and the situation of women scientists in Central and Eastern Europe and the Baltic States. These two expert groups will formulate recommendations to the Commission, but also to the other stakeholders at European Union and national levels.

In connection with the link between policy at European Union and national levels, allow me to point out that while Member States urged the Commission to reach the 40 per cent target in the resolution on science and society and on women and science, adopted at the 26 June Research council, they did not commit themselves to this same target.

CORDIS News: Would you consider establishing a league table of best practice in relation to this area?

PB: The Helsinki Group is about to finalise a European report on policies implemented at national level, which will include national statistical profiles. The members of the group themselves insisted on the necessity of carrying out a common critical assessment of the policies implemented. The Commission supports this work fully, but does not intend to give 'points' to the Member States. The promotion of gender equality is very much enshrined in the national, cultural background. There are different ways to tackle the promotion of women in science and this diversity should be maintained. However, the Commission intends to support cooperation between Member States and associated countries in the field of promoting women in science.

CORDIS News: What do you feel about having quotas or positive discrimination?

PB: In an ideal world, quotas or positive discrimination should not be necessary. But it may be useful on a transitional basis to change the culture in an environment, or to compensate for implicit bias playing against the targeted population. One has to distinguish between quotas and the positive concept of discrimination. A quota may be necessary to ensure that a group or panel satisfies multidimensional equilibrium, in terms of geographical, disciplinary or organisational backgrounds. In this respect, gender deserves at least the same level of attention as these other dimensions. Positive discrimination by which I mean actions exclusively reserved for women is a controversial policy approach. There are pros and cons towards it. I would prefer to develop policy devices accessible to both men and women, but taking into account women's lives and women's situations. It is about changing the norm, as put by the ETAN group and bringing the policy closer to women scientist's lives, instead of considering that the burden of conciliating their different lives rests only on their shoulders and is a matter for their private life. It is a matter of policy to allow women to fulfil the multiple roles they are still assigned to in society, as well as to progress towards more equality between men and women.

CORDIS News: How closely are you working with the DG Education and Culture and other authorities to ensure an adequate number of women is available for science and research?

PB: There is a very good cooperation between Commissioner Redding and myself, as well as between DG Education and Culture and DG Research. The strategic objectives of the European research area and the European education area are to be pursued together. The link between the under-representation of women in research and the need to encourage girls to embrace scientific studies is fully recognised. In Uppsala, there was an informal joint meeting of education and research ministers. The gender dimension was carefully addressed. We are working together with DG Education and Culture on this subject. At the 'Gender and Research' conference organised by DG Research on 8 and 9 November, there will be a session concentrating on the education dimension of the 'women and science' activities. Furthermore, in the strategy to make science more attractive to young people, the gender dimension will be very consciously integrated.

Text :

Remarks :

Data Source Provider : CORDIS News interview with Philippe Busquin
Document Reference : Based on a CORDIS News interview with Philippe Busquin
Programme Acronym : FRAMEWORK 6C, FRAMEWORK 5C, ERA, SCIENCE-SOCIETY C
Subject Index Codes : Policies, Social Aspects


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2. Women and science has 'great momentum', head of unit tells CORDIS News

Record Control Number : 17554

Date : 2001-10-30

Category : General policy

General Information :

Nicole Dewandre, head of unit for women and science in the European Commission's Directorate General for Research has told CORDIS News that she is confident of a 'great momentum' in her unit's cause at the moment. With over 500 participants attending the 'research and gender' conference in Brussels on 8 and 9 November, evidence supports this claim.

Since women and science first appeared on the Commission agenda in April 1998, the issue has risen steadily in profile. In January 2001, the women and science unit was created at the initiative of the Research DG's Directorate General Achilleas Mitsos.

'Developments had shown that it [women and science] was an important and strategic issue, at the heart of the science and society dilemma. And Commissioner Busquin has given it a prominent place in the European research area [ERA] strategy. The signal was to say that this issue deserves a unit on its own and also to underline our accountability for results achieved through the implementation of our action plan,' explains Ms Dewandre.

Women working in science appear to appreciate what is being initiated by the Commission. Requests come in from all over Europe, particularly for publications, but also for Commission representatives to attend events. On account of demand, the ETAN (European technology assessment network) report on 'promoting excellence through mainstreaming gender equality' has gone back into print.

Members of the Helsinki group, a group of national civil servants involved in promoting women in scientific research at national level, 'continuously report that membership reinforces their position inside their own Member States or associated countries,' said Ms Dewandre, who added that it is a 'win-win situation for each member'.

The Helsinki group are so satisfied with their participation in the task of raising the profile of women in science that they are now themselves calling for the Commission to do still more. At a meeting of the group in May, members called for a joint critical assessment of their policies.

'Obviously this was a very interesting opportunity,' says Ms Dewandre. 'It's more interesting than just displaying how things are happening'. Consequently, the Helsinki Group's first official publication, 'Benchmarking national policies to promote women in science in Europe', will be available by the end of the year.

At the Helsinki group's December meeting, the national policy assessments will be discussed. 'We want to propose to the Helsinki group to deepen cooperation. For the moment they've worked in giving us information in the national context so that the Commission could make a synthesis and give back to everybody the knowledge of what's going on in all Member States,' Ms Dewandre told CORDIS News. 'Now that this phase is done, it's time to see how we can deepen cooperation between members,' she added. She regards the ETAN report as responsible for triggering 'an interesting dynamic' within the Helsinki group, and for leading the group to opt voluntarily for a new and enhanced form of cooperation.

The Commission's activities on the issue of women and science are about to be extended to include the EU's associated countries. These countries were involved in the Helsinki group from the beginning, but their situation was not covered in the ETAN report. The Commission is however making up for lost time, and is about to launch a study on the specificity of the situation in central and Eastern Europe.

Candidate countries will certainly not be under-represented at the forthcoming gender and research conference. Over 580 participants will attend the event, 100 of them as speakers. Some 40 countries will be represented at the event.

Ms Dewandre sees the conference also as 'an opportunity to trigger debate at national level'. The idea is that delegations will go home, and continue the debate at national level, and then themselves become or continue to be agents for change within their own country.

Ms Dewandre is aware of the challenges ahead, but is also optimistic about women and science in the future.

'The difficult thing is [...] that when you don't pay attention to gender or make things explicit, when you stop bothering people with this, it all of a sudden goes back to invisibility. The spillover effects are very hard to gain,' says Ms Dewandre. 'It's not that you just need to trigger something and it runs. If you forget about it, if you turn your back, the feeling is that it comes back as before.

'On the other hand, I really feel there is a great momentum within the community of women scientists and men caring for gender equality

- we don't want to exclude them. On the contrary. this means that people caring for this issue have to be motivated,' she says.

Text :

Remarks :

Data Source Provider : CORDIS News interview with Nicole Dewandre
Document Reference : Based on a CORDIS News interview with Nicole Dewandre
Programme Acronym : FRAMEWORK 6C, ERA, SCIENCE-SOCIETY C
Subject Index Codes : Social Aspects, Scientific Research
Contact Person : For further information on women and science and the 'gender and
research event', please consult the following web address: http:
//www.cordis.lu/rtd2002/science-society/women.htm

Różne wiadomości


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3. Europe unites for science week 2001

Record Control Number : 17544

Date : 2001-10-26

Category : Event

General Information :

A variety events will take place in more than 20 European countries during Science Week 2001, from 5 to 11 November. As part of the initiative, seven projects selected by the European Commission will organise events across Europe.

'The Union has reinforced and will still reinforce its support for the development of citizens' scientific and technological literacy. We believe this is an important issue,' said EU Research Commissioner Philippe Busquin. 'Today teaching has become too theoretical, perhaps as a result of a shortage of funds. Initiatives such as the European science week allow us to reintroduce the intuitive dimension into teaching science. They also reinforce dialogue and enable researchers to keep an eye on citizens' expectations,' he said.

EuroPaws, (European public awareness of science initiative) involves partners from Belgium, France and the UK and is seeking to raise public awareness of science through television through initiatives such as grants for TV drama scriptwriting, a festival of TV dramas and prizes for dramas based on factual science stories and fictional stories in which science or technology play a major role. An award ceremony will take place on 5 November in London followed by a project presentation in Brussels on 7 November.

Life in the Universe is a project inviting secondary school students in 23 European countries to present their conception of the universe: What does the 'big bang' theory mean: What forms of life could exist outside the solar system? What constitutes life? What do scientists know about the origins of the works and the worlds around us? Contributions range from the creation of a website to theatre. Two winners from each country will be selected to present their projects at CERN (the European laboratory for particle physics) from 8 to 11 November. Overall winners will receive an invitation to the launch of the Ariane rocket and a visit to the European southern observatory (ESO) in Chile.

A 45 minute documentary on plant biotechnology and a conference debate on the implications of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) will be shown at four European science museums: Munich, Bristol, Brussels and Madrid during science week. Part of the 'Biotech Europe' project, the debate on 8 November will feature Mr Busquin.

'Infoplanet', a project involving partners from Spain, Greece, Italy and Portugal will culminate in four educational exhibitions (Rome, Thessaloniki, Barcelona and Porto) presenting the latest developments in the field of renewable energy sources, particularly in the Mediterranean region. At each venue, secondary school pupils will be able to meet and debate with researchers and other experts from the field.

PUSH 2001 aims to take a close look at educational modules which permit an active approach to scientific concepts by giving students the opportunity to carry out experiments. Over three days, participants will talk with researchers and attend workshops, which will include dramatisations of science, looking at the work of da Vinci, Darwin and Linnaeus. The workshops will take place in Italy, England and Sweden, the home countries of these legendary scientists.

'Small is beautiful' is a European project aimed at illustrating how microsystems perform. Microsystems, or minute devices, are playing an increasingly important role in our society. Airbags in cars are controlled by Microsystems no bigger than a fingernail and electronic noses detect whether or not food is fresh. During science week, the project participants from the UK will present an exhibition in Manchester, UK, demonstrating the products, applications and developments of the future of micro-intelligence. The exhibition's four main themes will be mobility, daily life, work and communication. A conference will also take place in Manchester on 6 to 10 November.

'Energetic friends' is a collection of ten projects selected by the European Commission from a competition open to teams of young scientists aged between 12 and 18, supported by an adult, from Estonia, Latvia or Finland. Projects had to relate to energy. Finalists will present their work with the aid of multimedia resources in Tallinn, Estonia between 5 and 8 November.

Text :

Remarks :

Data Source Provider : European Commission, Research DG
Document Reference : Based on an event announcement
Programme Acronym : FRAMEWORK 6C, SCIENCE-SOCIETY C
Subject Index Codes : Scientific Research, Education, Training
Contact Person : For further information, please consult the following web address:
http://www.cordis.lu/scienceweek

Below are the contact details for the seven projects selected by
the European Commission:

EuroPAWS:
E-mail: events@europaws.globalnet.co.uk
http://www.europaws.org

Life in the Universe
E-mail: monica.de.pasquale@cern.chWebsite
http://www.lifeinuniverse.org

Biotech Europe
E-mail: info_en@infoplanetproject.com
or
E-mail: 100715.331@compuserve.com
http://www.terra-eu.org

Infoplanet
E-mail: a.picano@innova-eu.net
http://www.infoplanetproject.com

PUSH 2001
E-mail: m.pazzagli@dfc.unifi.it
or
E-mail: campbellAK@cardiff.ac.uk
or
E-mail: peter.bergsten@medcellbiol.uu.se
http://www.poggio-imperiale.it/push2001/welcome.html
http://www.darwincentre.com

Small is beautiful
E-mail: micro-world@vdivde-it.de
http://www.micor-worlds.org

Energetic Friends
E-mail: kertu@energiakeskus.ee
http://www.energeticfriends.org

Journalists wishing to attend any of the events should contact:
Michel Claessens
Tel: +32-2-295 9971
E-mail: michel.claessens@cec.eu.int

or

Melanie Kitchener
Tel: +32-2-295 0686
E-mail: Melanie.kitcheners@cec.eu.int


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4. Patinnova identifies European patent problems - could Denmark solve them?

Record Control Number : 17564

Date : 2001-10-31

Category : Miscellaneous

General Information :

The conference conclusions of the Patinnova 2001 event held in Cardiff from 15 to 17 October point to the perennial problem of effective patenting being largely out of the reach for European SMEs (small and medium sized enterprises) . Translation, litigation and agent costs all mean that it is an expensive business for SMEs to apply for patents and even costlier to defend them.

But a report compiled by the Danish Ministry of trade and industry puts forward a new proposal on how to address the situation. Publicly subsidised legal expense insurance would, according to the report, give SMEs the financial cushion enabling them to defend patents. Too many of those who infringe patents do so knowing that the patent owner will not have the means to defend it.

Not only would this scheme help the SMEs to defend the results of their research and development (R&D) , it would also encourage more SMEs to carry out R&D. Many SMEs are currently shying away from significant investment in R&D, aware that there is little chance of defending the patents on their results effectively if they are breached.

The report suggests that public subsidising of legal expense costs be a temporary measure, working on the pump priming principle that the public sector could help fund until a critical mass of insurers ready to take on the work and a framework for how it will be executed is decided.

Once the measure has been successful, there is a need to look at the international dimension of patents. As the report points out, 'patents held by Danes in Denmark are only a small portion of the total patent portfolio held by Danes.' Ensuring that mutual recognition of patents takes place would be a key element of the programme's international success.

'Such a legal expense insurance programme increases the value of patents [and] benefits the economy via two channels,' says the paper. 'Firstly, there is the direct channel. An increase in the value of the patent systems corresponds to a greater implicit subsidy to R&D efforts of the firms taking out the patents, and those efforts thus increase. Secondly, there is the indirect channel. The increased R&D efforts mean more patents which increase the spread of knowledge in the economy.'

According to a source at the Danish Ministry of trade and industry, the Danish Presidency in the second half of 2002 could be used as a launch pad for progress on this programme. He also confirmed that Denmark is sounding out the other Member States to see if there is support for the idea and added that he hoped a compromise would not be rushed through before the Danish Presidency began. Work on the plan has been going on for several years, and the Danes feel that, once details of how the subsidies will take place and to what per cent, the plan will be a perfect means of addressing the ongoing issue of how to provide effective patent protection for SMEs in Europe.

The conclusions of the Patinnova conference also highlighted that even finding out that a patent has been infringed is difficult for SMEs. This is particularly relevant, the conclusions stated, as the majority of world spending is on services based on information, rather than manufacturing, based on tangible products. Following on from this it was decided that 'the Commission will look into possible ways to offer support not only for starting up or spinning out innovative enterprises, but also to help them survive in a competitive market place.'

But by the same token, the conclusions emphasised that the baton must pass to the Member States in driving progress forward. 'We already have unrestricted movement of people, goods, capital and services, but we need now to put the free market for ideas high up on the agenda of each government so that we may get a reasonable consensus on the Community patent. The Commission has already done its share of work -Member States now need to find a reasonable compromise.'

Text :

Remarks :
The Danish report referred to is entitled' Economic consequence of
legal expense insurance for patents'

Data Source Provider : PATINNOVA 2001 conclusions and Danish government
Document Reference : PATINNOVA 2001 conclusions and Danish report
Programme Acronym : MS-DK C
Subject Index Codes : Economic Aspects, Policies, Information, Media
Contact Person : For further information on PATINNOVA, please consult the following
web address:
http://www.patinnova.org

For further information on the Danish Ministry of trade and
industry, please consult the following web address:
http://www.em.dk

Programy Unii Europejskiej


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5. CORDIS' SME techWeb - facilitating SME participation in European research

Record Control Number : 17559

Date : 2001-10-30

Category : Programme implementation

General Information :

CORDIS, the European Commission's Research and Development Information Service, is hosting a new service to help small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) participate in and benefit from European research funding.

The redesigned service aims to help innovative SMEs by offering information and guidance on all specific measures for SMEs, including cooperative research projects. The service provides access to key participation rules and documents, gives step-by-step advice on proposal submission and partner searches and information on contractual issues.

In addition, the service provides SME managers with an overview of previous research projects and result exploitation. A list of training opportunities and support contact points is given, including the SME 'helpline' and the local support network of National Contact Points (NCPs) . Innovative SME-related events and news will regularly be published on the service with a specific focus on the European research area (ERA) and the place of SMEs in the next Framework programme (FP6) .

Text :

Remarks :

Data Source Provider : CIMS
Document Reference : Based on information from service provider
Programme Acronym : FRAMEWORK 3C, FRAMEWORK 5C, BRITE/EURAM 2, CRAFT, INNOVATION-SME,
FRAMEWORK 6C, ERA
Subject Index Codes : Policies, Economic Aspects, Innovation, Technology Transfer
Contact Person : For further information, please consult the following web address:

http://www.cordis.lu/sme

Wydarzenia, warsztaty, konferencje


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6. Explore information resources at 'online information 2001'

Record Control Number : 17546

Date : 2001-10-26

Category : Event

General Information :

Some 300 companies will exhibit some of the world's best information resources together with solutions for information management, knowledge exchange, ePublishng, content management, intranets and extranets at 'online information 2001' in London, UK on 4 to 6 December 2001.

The event will include information classes from international experts covering web search engines, new tools and technologies for content delivery and resources for company and financial information, seminars on eBusiness and an insight into eContent.

Text :

Remarks :

Data Source Provider : Event organisers
Document Reference : Based on an event announcement
Subject Index Codes : Information Processing, Information Systems, Innovation, Technology
Transfer, Information, Media, Economic Aspects
Contact Person : For further information, please:
Tel: +44 1923 690647
Fax: +44 1923 690680

or consult the following web address:
http://www.online-information.co.uk


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7. Winners of IST prizes named

Record Control Number : 17545

Date : 2001-10-26

Category : General policy

General Information :

The 20 winners of the European IT (information technology) prize have been announced. They will be showcased at the IST 2001 event in Düsseldorf on 3 to 5 December.

Each prize winner receives 5,000 euro. The three grand prize winners, to be announced at the IST 2001 event, will however each be handed the 200,000 euro grand prize by European Information society and Enterprise Commissioner, Erkki Liikanen. This grand prize has proved a spur to previous winners to develop their results into marketable entities.

'Experience from the past seven years shows that the prize generates international recognition and huge interest from venture capitalism, facilitating the start-up phase and access to finance,' Mr Liikanen said. The awards were decided by a European jury that had been drawn up by Euro-CASE, the European council of applied science and engineering, which also organises the awards, in collaboration with the IST (information society technologies) programme of the Fifth Framework programme.

The stated criteria for winning require that the projects must display technical excellence, innovative content, potential market value and the capacity to generate new jobs.

This year's 20 winners are drawn from Denmark, France, Germany, Israel, Norway, Spain, Switzerland and the UK. The themes of the winning projects included software applications for medical, object identification and 3D modelling, as well as a tool which can identify child pornography on the Internet. A family of mobile robots which has business applications is also one of the winners.

Text :

Remarks :

Data Source Provider : European Commission
Document Reference : Based on a press release
Programme Acronym : FRAMEWORK 5C, IST
Subject Index Codes : Information, Media, Evaluation, Innovation, Technology Transfer
Contact Person : For further information on the prize winners, please consult the
following web address:
http://www.it-prize.org

For further information on the IST 2001 event, please consult:
http://2001.istevent.cec.eu.int

Konkursy i oferty Unii Europejskiej


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8. Pre-validating alternative methods for testing dental filling materials

Record Control Number : 17552

Date : 2001-10-29

Category : Tender

General Information :

The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) has published a call for tenders for a study on pre-validation of an alternative method or methods for the biocompatibility testing of dental filling materials.

The aim of the study is to obtain a preliminary assessment of the relevance and reliability of one or more 'in vitro' tests for the biocompatibility of dental filling materials, by performing an experimental study according to the ECVAM principles and procedures of pre-validation.

Text :

Remarks :
The deadline for requesting tender documents is 07.11.2001.
The deadline for submitting tender documents is 22.11.2001.

Before contacting the Commission, tenderers are strongly advised to
consult the original call text in the Official Journal of the
European Communities at the reference below.

Data Source Provider : Official Journal of the European Communities
Document Reference : OJ No S 208-142130 of 27.10.2001, p.41
Programme Acronym : FRAMEWORK 5C
Subject Index Codes : Medicine, Health, Scientific Research
Contact Person : For further information, please contact:

European Commission
Directorate-General JRC
Institute for Health and Consumer Protection
European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods
Attn: Dr A Worth
Via Fermi 1
TP 580
I-21020 Ispra
Tel: +39 03 32 78 95 66
Fax: +39 03 32 78 58 45


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9. Commission calls for study on implications of numbering, naming and addressing

Record Control Number : 17561

Date : 2001-10-30

Category : Tender

General Information :

The European Commission's Information Society DG has given prior information of a call for tenders for a study on the policy implications of convergence in the field of numbering, naming and addressing.

A far reaching convergence of telecommunications and the Internet is currently taking place. This will bring different businesses and their cultures together and indeed the different regulatory systems and practices.

Numbers, names and addresses have a pivotal role for delivering services in convergent networks and the area could become an important control point for market players.

In this context, the European Commission is in need of a study which identifies the policy implications of convergence in the field of numbering, naming and addressing.

The envisaged budget for this study is 100,000 euro.

Text :

Remarks :
Before contacting the Commission, tenderers are strongly advised to
consult the original call text, when available, in the Official
Journal of the European Communities at the reference below.

Data Source Provider : Official Journal of the European Communities
Document Reference : OJ No S 209-142875 of 31.10.2001, p.62
Subject Index Codes : Information Processing, Information Systems, Innovation, Technology Transfer


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Stronę przygotował Piotr Sadłowski