Additional Information Document

 

 

 

4th  and 5th Calls for Proposals

 

DRAFT OCTOBER DECEMBER 2000

 

Task Descriptions

 

Key Action

Sustainable Mobility and Intermodality

 

 

Thematic Programme

“Competitive and Sustainable Growth”

 

 

5th Framework Programme

 

 

615 October December 2000


INTRODUCTION

 

This document gives additional information concerning the specifications and objectives of all tasks foreseen in the fourth and fifth calls for proposals of the Key Action “Sustainable Mobility and Intermodality” of the Thematic Programme “Competitive and Sustainable Growth”.

 

All proposals submitted for this Key Action in the framework of these periodic calls should address one of these tasks or sub-tasks as indicated in the task description, all of which are linked with the strategy and priorities defined for this call in the work programme, as updated.

 

The first three digits of the reference number mentioned together with each task title indicates the work programme reference number. An example: 2.1.1 stands for “Socio-economic scenarios for the mobility of people and goods”, subheading “Quantitative tools for decision making”. The number after the slash is the sequential number of the task within one research areas following the last number of the previous call.

 

Involvement of Non-EU countries (Item 8). Entities from Associated States to the Fifth Framework Programme are always welcome to participate. The information given within this item aims at inviting more expresly consortia to involve their entities for a given task, and sometimes entities from other identified third countries.

 

This document can also be downloaded from the Homepage of the Grwoth Programme 3 on the Internet:

 

http://www.cordis.lu/growth

 

Appended to this document, you can find the list of tasks launched in the 1st call  (March 1999), in the 2nd call (December 1999) and in the 3rd call (June 2000)

 

 


 

TASK DESCRIPTIONS

 

4th CALL. December 2000

 

 

 

This call includes

CIVITAS and GALILEO


OVERVIEW OF TASKS

4th CALL – December 2000

 

CIVITAS

 

Objective 2.1  Socio-economic scenarios for mobility of people and goods

2.1.3       Policies for sustainable mobility

2.1.3/8    Increasing the urban transport system’s sustainability and efficiency through radical strategies for Clean Urban Transport

2.1.3/9    Accompanying measure for monitoring and evaluating the introduction of radical strategies for Clean Urban Transport

 

 

GALILEO

Objective 2.3 Modal and intermodal transport management systems

2.3.3       Second Generation GNSS

2.3.3/6    Local eElements Ddefinition

2.3.3/7    Impact of interoperability on the system definitionImpact of Interoperability on the System Definition

2.3.3/8    Frequencies allocation and protection, Certification and Standardisation

Standardisation, Certification and Frequencies

2.3.3/9    Development and Ooptimal Uuse of sSatellite nNavigation for all mModes of Ttransport

2.3.3/10   Detailed Sservice aAnalysis

2.3.3/11  Legal, institutional and regulatory framework for GALILEO Regulatory framework for GALILEO

 

 

           
Task 2.1.3/8

Task 2.1.3/8   Title:    Increasing the urban transport system’s sustainability and efficiency  through radical strategies for Clean Urban Transport

 

This task description offers additional information about the combined call for proposals for Clean Urban Transport demonstration projects, the CIVITAS initiative (CIty – VITAlity – Sustainability), which is supported by the Key Action Economic and Efficient Energy of the ‘Energie’ Programme and the Key Action Sustainable Mobility and Intermodality of the ‘Growth’ Programme[1]. A budget of up to 50 Million Euro has been earmarked as EU contribution, depending on the quality of the proposals received.

 

1. Problem description

 

 

About three-quarters of the EU population live in urban areas. Over 30% of all transport kilometres are made in towns. Traffic congestion is expected to increase and this not only results in problems at local level, it also creates bottlenecks on the Trans-European Transport Networks, especially in the interface with urban areas. According to estimations around 80 % of all external costs of transport in urban areas result from congestion.

 

Energy consumption of transport in cities is increasing rapidly, with private cars and commercial vehicles being responsible for 98% of energy consumption in urban transport. Urban traffic is responsible for more than 10% of all C02 emissions in the EU. The danger of unsustainable traffic growth and worsening living conditions, as well as political commitments such as the Kyoto agreement and the eEurope initiative, emphasise the need for an integrated approach.

 

The need for radical change, based upon a mixture of technology and policy based measures, will be emphasised in a new Commission Green Paper on Clean Urban Transport. The paper will also highlight the important role of Community-funded integrated demonstration and assessment projects, which are of a sufficiently large size to have a visible impact on decision-makers and citizens.

 

2. Task description

 

 

The objective of this initiative is to assess the impacts, including those on congestion, energy consumption, noise and air pollution, of the introduction of radical integrated sustainable urban transport policy strategies, supported by innovative measures, technologies and infrastructures. These strategies should particularly aim at achieving a shift in modal choice of people who have the option of car use towards alternatives.

 

The proposals for this initiative should combine energy-efficient, cost-effective and clean public and/or private vehicle fleets and the necessary fixed infrastructure (e.g. fuelling), with a wider package of measures in order to cover both the transport demand and supply side. The radical integrated urban transport policy package should be city wide, and it should address as many as possible of the following seven policy-fields:

·        Demand management strategies based upon access restrictions to the inner city areas and other sensitive zones by means of introducing access control permitting access only to clean and energy efficient vehicles, and to cycling and walking;

 

·        Demand management and revenue raising strategies based upon integrated pricing strategies by means of introducing full scale area wide or city wide pricing schemes;

 

·        Stimulation of collective passenger transport and its quality of service by means of introducing clean and energy efficient vehicle fleets; non-conventional transport systems; innovative organisational, financing and management schemes; improved accessibility, security and safety; integration with walking, cycling and other modes;

 

·        New forms of vehicle use and/or ownership and lifestyle by means of introducing new mobility services based upon clean and energy efficient vehicle fleets; car free housing; shared use/ownership of cars, motorised two-wheelers and bicycles;

 

·        New concepts for the distribution of goods by means of introducing innovative logistics services using clean and energy efficient vehicle fleets, dedicated infrastructure and information services;

 

·        Innovative ‘soft’ measures for managing mobility demand by means of introducing new approaches to integrated planning; promoting green transport plans, safe walking and cycling, mobility marketing and awareness;

 

·        Integration of transport management systems, including related information systems, and passenger services, such as those for intermodal travel information, transport pricing and payment, vehicle location and guidance and traffic management.

 

The proposals must prove that the proposed package is capable of achieving a significant change in modal split and in tackling congestion across a whole city or city-region. They must indicate the initiatives taken to modernise the organisational and financial frameworks for public transport, how the proposed measures support economic development of the city and how planning policy is used to manage the transport impact of dispersal of activities, for instance through integrated land use and transport planning oriented towards public transport.

 

The proposals must provide clear evidence of political consensus and support, as well as of the fact that the necessary collaborative frameworks are in place to maximise the chances of success. They must build upon the large-scale application of innovative technology; no new research or development of technology should be foreseen as part of this initiative.

 

Wherever references are made to clean vehicles this means that these should be based upon at least the Euro-4 standard. Introducing higher standards for certain types of vehicles and/or in certain areas is encouraged. A vehicle fleet is a coherent group of vehicles operated by a single operator in a single urban area. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Expected results

 

It is expected that the initiative will produce a number of coherent recommendations on the impacts of radical change in urban transport policy, as well as on the indirect effects on other sectorial policies. Special attention should be paid to analysing the process of preparing and implementing policy change.

 

This requires a sound impact assessment and evaluation plan, based upon a clearly defined set of ‘technical’ indicators and targets, as well as other relevant issues such as citizen’s response and acceptance, enforcement, economic and financial feasibility, institutional setting, etc. In addition, a plan for wide dissemination of experiences and spread of results should be prepared in order to support acceptance and normalisation and to maximise the impacts on the policies of cities not directly involved in the initiative (multiplier effect).

 

4. Type of contract

 

Selected demonstration projects can receive up to 35% EU funding of the allowable and justified costs. In principle, only those costs that are clearly linked to the proposed activities, and that are clearly additional to normal investment and operations costs, will be considered. This excludes large-scale infrastructure investments. For certain costs, such as equipment, the standard depreciation rules defined at the level of the Fifth Framework Programme apply. 

 

5. Timing / Duration

 

This initiative will be opened in parallel by the Key Action Economic and Efficient Energy of the ‘Energie’ Programme (Target Action – 5th call for proposals in October 2000) and by the Key Action Sustainable Mobility and Intermodality of the ‘Growth’ Programme (4th call for proposals in December 2000). Both calls will close in March 2001. Contract signature is foreseen for autumn 2001. The indicative contract length is 36 to 48 months. An inception phase and a mid term assessment procedure are foreseen.

 

Proposals can be submitted to one of the two programmes, but they must address the objectives, scope and priorities of both programmes. This means that the evaluation criteria and the evaluation thresholds, as described in the evaluation manuals, from both programmes are applicable for each proposal.

 

6. References

 

Several European Commission policy papers relevant for urban transport provide background information to this task. These include the 1995 Citizens’ Network Green Paper (COM (95) 601), and the 1998 Communication Developing the Citizens’ Network (COM (1998) 431). In addition, the new Green Paper on Clean Urban Transport and the new European transport policy White Paper (both under preparation) should be mentioned.

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. Links

 

Proposals should clearly build upon and incorporate the results of relevant previous and ongoing Community research activities in the fields of energy, transport, information society technologies, urban quality of life, etc.

 

A separate accompanying project is envisaged that will be responsible for independent monitoring of the demonstration activities – based upon data and reports provided by the demonstration sites, and for the development and implementation of a cross-site evaluation framework. Through this separate project, additional co-ordination and dissemination initiatives could also be undertaken.

 

Those wishing to make research proposals related to the specific issue of the integration of land use planning and transport planning are referred to the Key Action City of Tomorrow and Cultural Heritage (see http://www.cordis.lu/fp5/src/ec-en7.htm), and its third call that is planned for the end of 2000 (see http://www.cordis.lu/eesd/calls/calls.htm).

 

Four action lines of the IST Programme Key Action Systems and Services for the Citizen, specifically related to Transport and Tourism (I.5.1-I.5.4), are open until 31 October 2000 for research, demonstration and/or take-up proposals regarding intelligent systems for transport infrastructures, vehicles, tourism and travel services as well as electronic fee collection. Relevant work may be funded in the IST cross-programme action (CPA3) on Infomobility and geo-information services (see http://www.cordis.lu/ist/calls/calls.htm). It is anticipated that IST action lines related to transport and tourism to be opened in 2001 will concern intelligent transport systems, integrated vehicle infrastructure systems, ambient intelligent application systems for mobile users and travel/tourism businesses as well as best practice and trials in transport and tourism.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

 

Participation by cities in Accession Countries is particularly encouraged.

 

9. Consortium profile

 

Proposals should be prepared by clearly committed cross-national pairs of local initiatives, with each initiative being located in a different country. Each pair should be made up of a lead site and a follower site and should clearly be local-authority driven. Each local initiative should, based upon a partnership approach, incorporate the main relevant actors.

 

Lead sites should follow the integrative policy-driven approach described above, addressing a maximum number of policy fields. The follower sites should have a more limited responsibility in focusing their work on one specific policy field, with access restriction, collective transport, new forms of vehicle use/ownership and goods distribution being considered as priority fields. The follower sites should also contribute to the validation of the project’s results and to dissemination and awareness activities. During contract negotiations, the successful proposals could be clustered and/or merged into larger contracts following the evaluator’s guidance.

Taking into account the objective of this initiative, it is probably best suited for medium sized and large cities. The peri-urban areas associated to cities are also addressed by this initiative, including the large-scale infrastructures located in these peri-urban areas that often provide the interface with long distance networks.

 

 

 

 


Task 2.1.3/9   Accompanying measure for monitoring and evaluating the introduction of

radical strategies for Clean Urban Transport

 

Title:   Accompanying measure for monitoring and evaluating the introduction of

radical strategies for Clean Urban Transport

 

1. Problem description

 

This task is part of the CIVITAS initiative and is linked to task ….. on ‘Increasing the urban transport system’s sustainability and efficiency through radical strategies for Clean Urban Transport’. The projects that will be supported under the demonstration task will combine energy-efficient, cost-effective and clean public and/or private vehicle fleets with a wider package of innovative measures in order to cover both the transport demand and supply side.

 

There is a need to obtain independent knowledge on the impacts of the introduction of radical integrated sustainable urban transport strategies. Clear European-level policy recommendations can only be developed through a sound and independent pan-European monitoring and evaluation programme. This programme should look at ‘technical’ impacts, such as traffic growth, modal split, energy consumption, noise and air pollution as well as at other impacts relevant to the policy change process such as citizen’s response and acceptance, enforcement, economic and financial feasibility, institutional setting, etc.

 

2. Task description

 

The project will be responsible for:

·        The development and implementation of an independent pan-European cross-site evaluation programme, in close co-operation with the demonstrators, on the basis of before and after data that will be provided by the demonstration sites. This includes providing specialist advice on the contents, the quality and quantity of the data to be collected at local level. This evaluation programme should be based upon the use of high quality before and after data that allow for minimal margins of error in order to be able to assess whether real changes have occurred. Besides providing input to the pan-European cross-site evaluation, the demonstrators will be responsible for running their own local evaluation programme.

·        The development and modelling of a do-nothing baseline scenario for each demonstration site based upon data provided by the sites, against which the technical impacts of the demonstrations will be assessed.

·        Independent monitoring of the progress in the implementation of the demonstrations based upon regular technical, financial and management reports provided by the demonstration sites. This includes visits to the sites in order to assess progress and to evaluate the quality of the work performed, as well as providing specialist and independent advice to the Commission[2].

·        The development and implementation of a pan-European programme for valorisation of results, dissemination and awareness raising activities, in close co-operation with the demonstration sites. This includes the establishment and regular updating of a separate CIVITAS section on the European Local Transport Information Service on the Internet (www.eltis.org) , the preparation of documentation and the organisation of specific events. The demonstrators will manage their own dissemination programme at local/national level.

·        Supporting the activities described above by establishing an advisory committee consisting of leading experts and practitioners which have experience in the management and the evaluation of large scale and complex demonstration projects, as well as in pan-European dissemination, awareness raising and consensus building activities. At least once a year one nominated representative per Member State should be invited for a meeting of this committee.

 

3. Expected results

 

It is expected that the project will deliver the following specific results:

·        clear European-level policy recommendations, based upon an independent pan-European cross-site evaluation programme in combination with independent monitoring of the implementation of the demonstrators;

·        the provision of specialist and independent advice to the Commission;

·        a programme for European-level dissemination and awareness raising activities, in order to support acceptance and normalisation and to maximise the impacts on other cities’ policies of the demonstration activities;

·        the provision of scientific and practical guidance on the development and implementation of the CIVITAS initiative through a series of meetings involving external experts, practitioners and Member States representatives;

·        the development and implementation of a mechanism for internal quality control.

 

4. Type of contract

 

Accompanying Measure (up to 100% EU funding).

 

5. Timing / Duration

 

4th call (December 2000). The indicative contract length is 48 months, but the final duration will only be decided once the length of the contract(s) for the demonstration task has been decided. An inception phase and a mid term assessment procedure are foreseen.

 

6. References

 

Several European Commission papers relevant for urban transport explain the policy background information to this task. These include the 1995 Citizens’ Network Green Paper (COM (95) 601), and the 1998 Communication Developing the Citizens’ Network (COM (1998) 431). New relevant policy papers are being prepared by the European Commission.

 

7. Links

 

Proposals for this accompanying measure should clearly build upon and incorporate the results of relevant (inter) national activities in the field of evaluation and indicators. Of particular importance are the guidelines developed by the MAESTRO project on impact assessment of demonstration activities. This project was part of the FP4 Transport RTD Programme. The impact assessments and dissemination activities undertaken by the Thermie Targeted Projects also provide a useful reference.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

 

As appropriate.

 

 

 

 

9. Consortium profile

 

Proposals should be prepared by small consortia consisting of a core-group of experts in the activities mentioned under 2. Specific technical expertise should be obtained through sub-contracts, about which a decision will be taken during the inception phase. Neither the members of the consortium nor the sub-contractors should have a direct or indirect involvement in the work of the demonstration sites. The project selected under this task should treat all information and data obtained from/on the demonstration


2.3.3/6 Local Components Elements Definition (GALILEO)

 

1. Problem Description

 

As outcome of the GALILEO definition phase projects, the  GALILEO architecture is composed of a global component providing a worldwide service, regional components and local components. The local components have been considered as vital devices that will provide users with tailored performances and services. They will allow on the one hand significative improvement of the basic performances of the global component for applications with specific requirements and on the other hand provide synergy for users of other systems, such as mobile communications.

The implementation of local components will allow the development of business cases for private operators.  The GALILEO management structure could decide to auction licenses to operate those devices on restricted area basis (e.g. urban areas, airports…). As a consequence they are considered as one of the most important “differentiators” with respect to current positioning systems.

This task has for main objective to contribute to the definition of the local components through an analysis of service providers needs and appropriate inputs to the detailed definition of the system.

The task has to interact in an organised manner and with appropriate documentation with the main detailed Definition, Development and Validation (DDV) Phase Projects[3] of the GALILEO system, which will run in parallel to this task.

 

2. Task Description

 

The following documents will be provided as input during the execution of this task:

- GALILEO Mission Requirements Document (MRD)[4]: describing the objectives of the GALILEO Programme (users needs, regulatory context, etc.)

- GALILEO System Requirements Document (SRD): Draft specification of the architecture including local component.

 

The work under this task shall include the following elements:

·        Mission and Requirements Definitions of generic local components for specific or multi-modal applications. These local components can either be based on existing technology adapted for satellite navigation or on the development of new technologies generated in Europe. Requirements such as all weather operation in the ports, coastal and oceanic areas, at airports and also cover all safety critical road, inland waterway and rail applications should be covered.

·        More detailed definition with corresponding updates/complement to MRD/SRD documents of one or several local components[5] that fit into the GALILEO infrastructure.

·        Definition of interfaces with other external systems to enable seamless transportation at low cost.

·        Analysis of cost impact on the architecture (development, deployment, operation)

·        Identification of legal implications: deployment of local components, operators concession, etc.

·        Market analysis justification for the proposed local component concept taking into account existing signal transmission alternatives for transport.

 

It is likely that those tasks have to be consolidated through pilot and/or demonstration  projects.[6]

 

3.  Expected Results

 

The expected results shall be consolidated by delivery of dedicated documentation[7]. The following results are expected:

·          Mission requirements for the generic local component.

·          Interfaces with the overall GALILEO architecture.

·          Interface with communications and reporting systems.

·          Specifications of the local area processing centre including the interfaces required for the provision of the signals to the users.

·          Definition of level of performances of the local area system.

·          Definition of the radio spectrum and the signal structure.

 

4. Type of contract    

Accompanying measures (up to 100% EU funding)

 

5. Timing/Duration

 

4th call (December 2000) / 18 months

 

 

 

6.  References

 

·          COM (1999) 54 final “GALILEO – Involving Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services”

·          Council Resolution of 19th July 1999 ( C221/3.08.99)  “The involvement of Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services — GALILEO-Definition phase”.

·          COM (439/2000 - Final) “Communication of the European Commission to the Council and European Parliament concerning  GALILEO”

 

 

 

 

 

7. Links

 

Link with overall architecture Definition project results (GALA, INTEG, GEMINUS, etc.)

Link with detailed definition, development and validation projects:

 ESA design consolidation (phase B2);

Development and Validation Phase (Phase C/D)

Link with the tasks:  

a) 2.3.3/7 Impact of interoperability on system Definition (GALILEO)

b) 2.3.3/8 Standardisation, Certification and Frequencies (GALILEO)

c) 2.3.3/9 Development and optimal use of satellite navigation for all modes of transport .

Link with existing European legislation applicable to the respective transport modes.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

 

As appropriate

 

9. Consortium Profile

 

·          Telematic sector with experience in road, railway and maritime applications

·          Sector of navigation, timing and positioning

·          Experiences in urban infrastructure including prospects for in-door services

·          City development sector

Experiences in Satellite navigation in the transport sector, ERTMS, ITS and UMTS.


2.3.3/7 Impact of interoperability on the system dDefinition (GALILEO)   

                                                                                                           

1. Problem Description 

 

The performance and robustness of the overall navigation service for users of various transport modes benefits from a good interoperability between different navigation systems. The same is true for solutions where services can easily and cost effectively be integrated within the user terminal. Interoperability enhances thus safety for transport users.

 

European Commission communication[8] notes that GALILEO will be a means of creating a Trans-European navigation network. Furthermore. GALILEO aims at becoming a global satellite navigation system that will be compatible with other satellite and terrestrial navigation systems in the world. At present satellite navigation is not used as sole means of navigation but together with other systems.

 

Research is needed on the navigation needs of various regions in order to achieve this interoperability and compatibility between GALILEO architecture and other navigation concepts in a given region,.

 

 where regional elements of GALILEO are concerned.

 

The current GALILEO baseline envisages i.a. possibility to offer regional services to countries outside Europe in addition to global integrity provided by Europe. This solution can be chosen where a region has specific demands in terms of liability, sovereignty, technical standards or industrial interest. Interoperability cuts across these demands. The regions take into account their existing and planned navigation systems when considering the use of GALILEO. 

 

Apart from GPS and GLONASS also the technical interoperability of regional augmentation systems EGNOS, WAAS and MSAS and their evolution are important factors impacting on the development of regional GALILEO services. The same applies for various terrestrial systems such as the Australian GRAS, Loran C or differential GPS.

 

For all transport applications there is a need for an interoperable system that will provide cost savings. Legal constraints could affect the world-wide distribution of GALILEO signals and their interoperability. Regions in the world need to be secured so that the user of satellite navigation knows which system he is using.

 

There is a need to identify main factors impacting on interoperability between GALILEO and existing navigation systems and their evolutions in regions outside Europe. The factors should be prioritised and their impact assessed so that it can be taken account where appropriate in refining GALILEO baseline.

 

The definition of the Galileo services and as consequence the performances obtainable to users are directly linked to the following main aspects affecting interoperability/compatibility.

·          The integration for the current EGNOS service: during the period 2003-2008 EGNOS will deliver alone its service to users, then in 2008 in combination with Galileo.

·          The interoperability with other existing navigation systems and concepts(GPS, DGPS,GLONASS, LORAN, WAAS, MSAS, GRAS) and its evolutions: international standards will evolve which will require upgrades of the current design.

·          The setting up of regional components outside Europe: with aims at developing export markets with safety of life application using European technology.

·          Adaptation of the different integrity transmission concepts (SBAS or MEO).

 

The task will allow the evaluation and validation of results obtained.

 

2. Task Description



The work under this task shall include the following elements:

 

·          Identification of main factors impacting on interoperability between GALILEO and existing navigation systems (GPS, GLONASS, LORAN, WAAS, MSAS, GRAS) and their evolutions in regions outside Europe.

·          Refinement of the GALILEO baseline taking into account these factors, EU-US and EU-Russia negotiation scenarios and GALILEO’s interfaces with other navigation systems.

·          Assessment of different integrity concepts in use and final evaluation taking into account technical and economical constraints.

·          Performance assessments (accuracy, availability, integrity, robustness etc…) of GALILEO services combined with GPS, GLONASS, terrestrial navigation systems and autonomous sensors of the receiver and vehicle respectively

·          Analysis of the improvement expected from regional components outside Europe in co-ordination with the EGNOS extension initiatives.

·          Clarification of legal constraints arising out of a mix of interoperable navigation services and liability attribution.

·          Migration from existing navigation systems (DGPS) as inputs for the deployment of  the GALILEO local elements

    

3.  Expected Results

 

·          Refinement of the final Galileo definition and system performances

·          Research results to support the refinement of GALILEO cooperation policies with regions outside Europe while addressing interoperability with other available navigation systems and the appropriate inclusion of local services

·          Prioritized list of factors impacting on interoperability and thus the viability of combined navigation services.

·          Impact of EGNOS extention and GALILEO to interoperability of regional services.

·          Global acceptability of interoperable and compatible GALILEO services

·          Input to legal work aiming at acceptability of a interoperable global GALILEO navigation service ( users guide for regulatory authorities)

·          Input to international standardisation process

 

 

 

4. Type of contract

 

Accompanying measures (up to 100% EU funding)

 

5. Timing/Duration

 

4th call (December 2000) / 18 months

 

6.  References

 

·          COM (1999) 54 final “GALILEO – Involving Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services”

 

·          Council Resolution of 19th July 1999 (C221[ck1] [ck2] /3.08.99)  “The involvement of Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services — Galileo-Definition phase”

 

·          COM (439/2000 - Final) “Communication of the European Commission to the Council and European Parliament concerning GALILEO”

 

7. Links

Link with overall architecture Definition contracts.

Link with the following tasks:

a)  2.3.3/8 Standardisation, Certification and Frequencies (GALILEO)

b)  2.3.3/6 Local Elements Definition (GALILEO)

SAGA project

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

 

Non-EU countries with specific knowledge on the respective systems may be involved where appropriate.

 

9. Consortium profile

 

·          Institutional expertise with navigation systems.

·          Experience within the sector of  transport navigation services

·          Profound knowledge of system interoperability

·          Involvement in international standardisation process

·          International experience and expertise in world-wide transport concepts

·          Access to required data outside Europe

·          Frequency spectrum knowledge

 

 

 


2.3.3/8 Frequencies allocation and protection, Certification and Standardisation

 

1. Problem Description

 

Frequencies

The Istanbul WRC Conference in May 2000 confirmed and allocated new spectrum for Radio Navigation Satellite Systems (RNSS), i.e. including GALILEO. These allocation will be reviewed at the next WRC in 2003 and new constraints for the GALILEO architecture could be imposed as a result of technical studies on interference with existing Aeronautical Radio Navigation aids (ARNS) and with other RNSS systems (e.g. GPS and GLONASS).

 

Certification

Certification aspects are key to GALILEO success. Introduction of guarantees on the GALILEO signal requires the system to be certified and safe, and will enable insurance companies both to offer insurance on GALILEO services and to propose special premiums based on the use of GALILEO.

 

Standards        

Technical studies and ongoing support in standardisation activities are mandatory to spread GALILEO’s use in various applications under development. The acceptance of GALILEO by worldwide standardisation bodies is a prerequisite for the introduction of GALILEO in “Safety of life” applications.

 

2. Task Description

 

The following documents will be provided as input during the execution of this task:

·          GALILEO Mission Requirements Document (MRD)[9]: describing the objectives of the GALILEO Programme (users needs, regulatory context, etc.)

·          GALILEO System Requirements Document (SRD): Draft specification of the architecture including local component.

 

Frequencies

·          Technical drafting of signal structures and frequency compliance documents that will ensure spectrum allocation at ITU, as well as participation to the GALILEO-related working groups.

Support to EC in the GALILEO frequency allocation activities at ITU. Representation at ITU (Working Party 8D, Working Party 7D, Task Group 1/5) and CEPT (SE 28, PT3 and CPG) working groups dealing with RNSS matters will be required.

·          All necessary research activities to obtain the support of ITU Regions 1, 2, 3 administrations and technical co-ordination with involved third countries to ensure optimal frequency allocation for GALILEO (CITEL, APT, Arab and African regions).

·          Support to EC in the GALILEO frequency allocation activities at ITU. Representation at ITU (Working Party 8D, Working Party 7D, Task Group 1/5) and CEPT (SE 28, PT3 and CPG) working groups dealing with RNSS matters will be required.

·          Preparation and participation to WRC 2003.

·          Study of the best approach to be followed for GALILEO spectrum notification and allocation.

 

The activities under this task will assist co-ordination on GALILEO frequency related matters. The particular overall frequency organisational framework (National Administrations, Member States, European Commission, etc.) shall be respected.

 

Certification

·          Requirements identification for a successful certification of GALILEO signals and receiver equipment in all transport modes.

·          Support to the creation of a new certification environment suitable for GALILEO. In addition, existing certifications for all modes of transports have to be obtained for the pilot GALILEO infrastructure and a concept for obtaining a certification of the full constellation in all modes of transports has to be prepared.

·          Threat analysis for jamming and spoofing of the GALILEO signal and development of controlled access measures.

 

It is expected that space segment manufacturers, certification authorities and insurance companies will contribute to activities related to these tasks.

 

Standardisation

·          Support activities in standardisation procedures for spectrum and signal structure at standardisation bodies (e.g. ICAO, IMO, ETSI, etc.).

·          Study of the adequate signal structure and frequency selection that allows the standardisation process to proceed successfully.

·          Standardisation issues related to the production of digital maps, positioning data transmission formats (UMTS) and acceptance of GALILEO in applications like civil protection, transport of dangerous goods, fisheries, maritime surveillance, environment monitoring, etc.

 

The outcome of this work will be essential for the ongoing SAGA activities in terms of technical baseline and signal description.

 

3. Expected Results[10]

 

Preparation and introduction of GALILEO issues for WRC 2003 in order to ensure the viability of the chosen GALILEO architecture. It is expected that this task shall produce results to be used in International Fora to demonstrate the harmlessness of GALILEO in terms of interference.

 

Implementation of a certification procedure for GALILEO for most applications. Introduction of certification of GALILEO services to the responsible certification authorities in different states. Demonstration that GALILEO will offer safe services and is therefore able to get the required insurance cover.

 

Ensure the success of the standardisation activities regarding GALILEO at ICAO, ITU, IMO, IALA, ETSI, IEC and other standardisation bodies through technical documentation that leads to validation. Support in the technical standardisation activities related to signal structure and spectrum issues.

 

 

 

4. Type of contract

 

AM  (up to EU contribution 100%)

 

5. Timing / Duration

 

4th Call (December 2000) - 36 months

 

6.  References

 

·          COM (1999) 54 final “GALILEO – Involving Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services”

·          COM (2000) 439 final “Communication of the European Commission to the Council and European Parliament concerning  GALILEO”

·          Council Resolution of 19th July 1999 ( C221/3.08.99)  “The involvement of Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services — GALILEO-Definition phase”

 

·          Communication on the results of the World Radio Conference 2000.

 

·          WRC 2000 resolutions COM 5/15, COM 5/16, COM 5/19, COM 5/20, COM 5/21

 

7. Links

 

·          Link with the SAGA project.

·          Link with the following ITU working groups: Working Party 8D, Working Party   7D, Task Group 1/5.

·          Link with CEPT working groups SE 28, PT3 and CPG.

·          The work shall be performed in coherence with EC frequency policies.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

 

As appropriate involvement of CEPT, ATP and CITEL member countries.

 

9 Consortium profile

 

·        Industry

·        National authorities and administrations

·        Experience in WRC and ITU activities

·        Experience with certification at European level

·        Experience in existing standardization process (UMTS, ICAO, IMO, ERTMS)

 

 

 

 


2.3.3/9 Development and optimal use of satellite navigation for all modes of transport (GALILEO)

 

1. Problem Description

 

During the definition phase of the GALILEO programme, set of pilot projects (within the GALA project) has been studied, and case studies (part of the GEMINUS project) have demonstrated the economical benefits for some niche applications.

 

The definition phase work has shown the potential of setting up navigation applications before the full GALILEO system becomes operational in order to accelerate its use in the transport sector. The necessity to evaluate benefits of some “typical” local components through implementation of demonstrations and pilot projects, and through an analysis of their economical viability was also highlighted.

 

The projects covered under this task shall be based not only on existing positioning and timing services, but also on GNSS test beds in development (due account shall also be made of existing telecommunication services) and local component hardware development. The projects will highlight the benefits of GALILEO-enabled navigation (and timing) services in all transport modes, in view of their future implementation. Hybridisation with other sensors and systems (navigation and communication) is an important aspect that needs to be addressed. They shall take into account developments of standard and encompass (but are not restricted to) the following areas:

 

·          Mobility at sea (e.g. maritime monitoring, harbour entrance, etc.)

·          Urban mobility modes (including tunnels, underground, indoors parking, warehouses, etc.)

·          Air mobility (e.g. civil aviation, private flight air safety, etc.)

·          Rail Mobility (e.g. train control, train supervision, etc.)

·          Road mobility (e.g. dynamic route guidance, electronic tolling / cost recovery mechanisms, emergency and breakdown call and stolen vehicle services, travel and traffic information, road regulatory support and enforcement, etc.)

·          Safety of Life-related transport

·          Intermodal mobility (e.g. freight transport between all modes, inland waterways, transport of nuclear waste, etc.)

 

2. Task Description

 

The following documents will be provided as input during the execution of this task:

-        GALILEO Mission Requirements Document (MRD)[11]: describing the objectives of the GALILEO Programme (users needs, regulatory context…)

-        GALILEO System Requirement Document (SRD): Draft specification of the architecture including local component.

 

The projects will produce wide scale implementation of satellite navigation in various domains in Europe. Where possible, maximum visibility of the results shall be implemented (e.g. through so-called “big events”, like Olympic games or other international events, etc.).

 

Based on results of local component definition[12], the work under this task shall cover the following aspects:

·          Validation of the mission concept through simulations with participation of users.

·          Safety assessment of the local component concept for all modes of transport enabling a system that fulfils stringent standards and will be certifiable. This should also take into account the requirements for dangerous good transportation tracking.

·          Pilot projects for transport policies enforcement mechanisms (e.g. inner city speed control, dangerous goods tracking, mobility billing, etc.) based on a GALILEO local component.

·          Pilot projects in selected cities on applications such as fleet management, rescue services. These projects should actively involve the local authorities to adapt their requirements.

·          Definition and development for an integrated intelligent transport guidance system for specific context (e.g. the 2004 Olympics in Athens).

All pilot projects being likely to be implemented in 2002 should be based on simulation, pseudolites, existing systems and GNSS testbeds.  In first instance, priority should be given to the use of the EGNOS testbed, in a second step, the GALILEO System Test Bed (GSTB[13]) shall also be considered as an integral part of the pilot project environment.

 

3. Expected Results

 

·        Results of the improvement of Satellite Navigation performance in cities and tunnels (including in-door services).

·        Awareness of the improved performances of a GALILEO local component in cities throughout Europe, of satellite navigation services in general and highlight of the advantages with respect to actual navigation services.

·        Pilot applications that can be used by potential users.

·        Evidence on economic viability of the local component concept.

·        Synergy with other system in particular communication and reporting systems should be validated.

·        Demonstration based on satellite navigation with integrity information.

·        Validate the local component design definition.

·        Favour market acceptance of local components.

 

Pilot projects related to local components shall imperatively contribute to the corresponding local component definition[14].

 

4. Type of Contract

 

RTD project (up to 50% EU funding)

 

5. Timing/Duration

 

4th call (December 2000) /  36 months

 

6.  References

 

·          COM (1999) 54 final “GALILEO – Involving Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services”

·          Council Resolution of 19th July 1999 ( C221/3.08.99)  “The involvement of Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services — GALILEO-Definition phase”

·          COM (2000) 439 final “Communication of the European Commission to the Council and European Parliament concerning  GALILEO”

 

7. Links

 

-        Link with overall architecture Definition project results (GALA, INTEG, GEMINUS, etc.)

-        Link with detailed definition, development and validation projects:

a)      ESA design consolidation (phase B2)

b)      Development and Validation Phase (Phase C/D)

-        Link with testbeds development activities

-        Link with the tasks

a) 2.3.3/6 Local Components Definition (GALILEO)

b) 2.3.3/7 Impact of interoperability on system Definition (GALILEO)

c) 2.3.3/8 Standardisation, Certification and Frequencies (GALILEO)

-        Link with existing European legislation applicable to the respective transport modes

-        Due account shall also be taken of relevant activities in the other thematic programs of the Fifth Framework Programme with a particular emphasis on the developments made under the key action on Systems and Services for the Citizen of the Information Society Technology Programme.

-        Links with the ASTRON project from the Joint Research Centre.

 

This task and task 2.3.3/6 Local Components Definition (GALILEO) have to interact in an organised manner and with appropriate documentation.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

 

As appropriate.

 

9. Consortium profile

 

·          Sector of navigation, timing and positioning

·          Service providers, service operators, user associations and experts in the various application domains.

·          Experiences in urban infrastructure including prospects for in-door services

·          City development sector

·          Experiences in Satellite navigation in the transport sector, ERTMS, ITS and UMTS.

 


 

2.3.3/10 Detailed Sservice aAnalysis (GALILEO)

 

1. Problem dDescription

 

The high technology domain of satellite navigation and associated infrastructures is evolving at an impressive pace. The penetration of positioning and communication services in a wide range of applications creates new and changing needs every day.

 

The Galileo Definition Phase has allowed establishing a good definition of user needs based upon analysis of wide range of applications.  However, several aspects have to be consolidated.  For instance, characterisation of service attributes, discriminators and interoperability with respect to other systems; (positioning, mobiles systems), consolidation of service definition for Search and Rescue, Timing…

 

Moreover, the mechanisms to follow, analyse and anticipate user demand in terms of navigation and timing services have to be implemented. Full integration of services at system provider and user equipment level (taking into account development of local components) shall be addressed.

 

2. Task dDescription

 

The following documents will be provided as input during the execution of this task:

GALILEO Mission Requirements Document (MRD)[15]: describing the objectives of the GALILEO Programme (users needs, regulatory context…)

GALILEO System Requirement Document (SRD): Draft specification of the architecture including local component

 

A first sub-task focuses on the analysis and consolidation of user needs.  A second one cover the provision of appropriate tools to test the corresponding services at users level.

 

The projects under this task will provide the necessary experience, tools and data to ensure that the GALILEO design correctly covers the required user needs. Appropriate mechanisms will be put in place in order to influence GALILEO design with respect to “on-the-field” experience.

 

Sub Task-1: Market Aspects

 

The task shall cover the creation of a user consultation mechanism and participation to the elaboration and monitoring of mission requirements (including service definition).  The setting up of a navigation market observatory and market acceptance of local component shall also be addressed.

Intellectual Property Rights, patents and related aspects shall be analysed in terms of their impact on the use and commercialisation of GALILEO[16].

 

 

Sub Task-2: User Tools

 

Based on the results of the GALILEO definition phase (in particular GEMINUS project), a set of tools shall be developed in order to feed back user requirements to the system design:

 

-     Transport user products based on hybridisation of GALILEO services with other navigation systems in view of the development of fully integrated positioning/timing solutions for transport efficiency improvement.

-     Seamless/continuous urban mobility positioning/timing tools.

-     GALILEO transport application products core modules developments (Dual-mode GALILEO/GPS, multi-frequency, multiple channels).

 

3. Expected rResults

 

Sub Task-1: Market Aspects

 

The consolidation of users requirements should be documented through an update of the MRD at appropriate milestones[17].

 

The market observatory will provide the necessary information to perceive the most salient characteristics to be embedded in the GALILEO infrastructure design. This mechanism shall lead to an optimisation of the services offered by GALILEO.

 

Sub Task-2: User Tools

 

The complementary user tools projects will provide the necessary tools to verify the full integration of GALILEO in the transport user environment.

           

4. Type of Ccoontract

 

Sub Task-1: AM project (up to 100% EU funding)

Sub Task-2: RTD project (up to 50% EU funding)

 

5. Timing/Duration

 

4th call (December 2000) / 36 months

 

6.  References

 

·          COM (1999) 54 final “GALILEO – Involving Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services”

·          Council Resolution of 19th July 1999 (C221/3.08.99)  “The involvement of Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services — GALILEO-Definition phase”.

·          COM (2000) 439 final “Communication of the European Commission to the Council and European Parliament concerning  GALILEO”

 

 

7. Links

 

-        Link with overall architecture Definition project results (GALA, INTEG, GEMINUS, etc.)

-        Link with detailed definition, development and validation projects:

a)      ESA design consolidation (phase B2)

b)      Development and Validation Phase (Phase C/D)

-        Link with existing European legislation applicable to the respective transport modes

-        Links with the GNSS testbed developments.

-        Due account shall also be taken of the relevant activities in the other thematic programs with a particular emphasis on the developments made under the Fifth Framework Programme in key action “Systems and Services for the Citizen” of the Information Society Technology Programme. Particular attention shall also be placed on digital cartography developments.

-        Link with the setting up of a public private partnership for GALILEO.

-        Link with the following tasks

a) 2.3.3/7 Impact of interoperability on system Definition (GALILEO)

b) 2.3.3/8 Standardisation, Certification and Frequencies (GALILEO)

c) 2.3.3/9         Development and optimal use of satellite navigation for all modes of transport

d) 2.3.3/6 Local Components Definition (GALILEO)

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

 

As appropriate

 

9.Consortium profile

 

Equipment manufacturers, navigation- (and communication-) related companies, service providers, navigation/timing market experts, geographical information institutes / companies.

 

 

 


2.3.3/11 Legal, Iinstitutional and rRegulatory framework for GALILEO     

 

1. Problem dDescription

 

The Definition phase of GALILEO unveiled the urgent need to set up a suitable legal, institutional and regulatory framework for GALILEO with special emphasis on all safety of life and strategic applications (e.g.: Aviation, Waterborne Transport, Transport of dangerous goods, Railways).

Only a viable institutional and legal framework can guarantee the success of a Public-Private Partnership and the regulatory functions of the European Union.

Part of this framework needs to be the regulatory function of the public side because only the regulatory function justifies a long-term involvement of the public sector in the management of GALILEO.

Moreover, recent accidents have demonstrated that only a regulation of commercialised transport services provides the European citizens which the necessary degree of safety.

For the time being most of this regulation is being dealt within national legislation. As the transport widens to a sector without artificial borders, the regulation of this sector has to cope with it. Satellite navigation will be the first trans-national service that needs European wide regulation in order to comply with the safety standards. Hence the GALILEO signal needs to be regulated by a European wide regulatory mechanism. To ensure that the GALILEO signal complies with the safety standards, it appears necessary to set up a GALILEO signal regulator.

The GALILEO definition phase highlighted the need for a world-wide Intellectual Property Right and patent survey and analysis, in order to assess the potential market barriers associated.

The selection of a private operator to run the GALILEO system involves the need to establish a concession or licence model.

Potential revenue streams are also dependent on their legal feasibility or the possibility to make use of existing revenue streams (airports or ports taxes, etc.)

 

2. Task dDescription

 

The proposed study needs to address the following points:

·      Develop a suitable and feasible institutional scenario for the GALILEO operation.

·      International survey of IPR and patent constraints at the relevant IPR and patent   registers to identify possible  markets developments obstacles.

·      Assessment of the need for continuous public involvement based on regulatory constraints.

·      Assessment of the proposed PPP scenarios.

·      Review of the legal feasibility of using potential new or existing revenue streams.

·      Definition and applicability of potential dual use constraints for GALILEO signals and equipment.

·      Establish a suitable and viable scenario for a GALILEO regulator.

·      Define all elements of this new regulatory body including the institutional environment.

·      Define the  nature of the relationship between the public actors and the private actors involved in the GALILEO operation.(public and commercial services)

·      Elaborate recommendations to enable the implementation of position sensors inside radionavigation or existing on board users systems taking into account the protection of the privacy rights.

3. Expected Results

 

·          The study should assess the relevant legal constraints for the establishment of the GALILEO operation.

·          It should propose a feasible institutional framework.

·          An IPR and patent survey should enable the emergence of cost efficient added value services with  respect to IPR and patent legislation.

·          Contribution to the Definition of the missions of the future GALILEO regulator as well as proposing the way towards the establishment of the GALILEO definitive public body.

 

4. Type of contract

 

Accompanying measureM  (up to 100% EU fundingcontribution 100%)

 

5. Timing/ Duration  

 

4th Call (December 2000) / 24 months

 

6.  References

 

·        COM (1999) 54 final “GALILEO – Involving Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services”

·        Council Resolution of 19th July 1999 ( C221/3.08.99)  “The involvement of Europe in a new generation of satellite navigation services — Galileo-Definition phase”

·        COM (2000) 439 final “Communication of the European Commission to the Council and European Parliament concerning GALILEO”

 

7. Links

 

Claim and MUSSST studies

GALA, GEMINUS projects

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

As appropriate

 

9 Consortium profile

 

·        National authorities

·        Private companies with expertise in the subject matter

·        Expertise in international law

·        Universities and law schools

·        Outstanding experience in IPR and Patent survey and the European Office of Patents

 

 


 

TASK DESCRIPTIONS

 

5th CALL. JUNE 2001


OVERVIEW OF TASKS

5th CALL – JUNE 2001

 

Objective 2.1  Socio-economic scenarios for mobility of people and goods

2.1.1  Quantitative tools for decision-making

2.1.1/11  Transport information Agent for accessing the different ETIS

(European Transport policy Information System) data sources.

2.1.1/12 Observatory of the performance of the European airport system. Assessment of the impact of air-traffic in the airports

 

2.1.2  Driving forces in transport

2.1.2/9  The electronic revolution and its transport consequences

 

2.1.3  Policies for sustainable mobility

2.1.3/10 Use of revenues from transport pricing

2.1.2/11 Institutional issues in transport policy implementation

 

Objective 2.2  Infrastructures and their interfaces with transport means and systems

 

2.2.2  Environment

2.2.2/12 Scrappage Schemes for road and rail vehicles

 

2.2.3  Safety

2.2.3/14  New approach to railway safety management (part of SMART RAIL)

2.2.3/15  Methodology to collate flight/operational and human factors data to improve safety trend analysis within the air transport system

2.2.3/16  Life-cycle safety impact assessment of road planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance (task under preparation)

2.2.3/17  Further development of road safety standards with particular attention to the protection of vulnerable road users (task under preparation)

 

2.2.4  Security

2.2.4/1  Establishment of harmonised security and safety procedures for freight intermodal transport operations

 

2.2.5   Human Factors

2.2.5/8  Strengthening the professional knowledge of local and regional

    transport planners.

 

Objective 2.3  Modal and intermodal transport management systems

2.3.1  Traffic management systems

2.3.1/20  Demonstration of new approach to timetable planning and slot allocation in a corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network (part of SMART RAIL)

2.3.1/21  Intelligent shipping operations

 

2.3.2  Transport and mobility services

2.3.2/16  Demonstration of solutions for imporved service reliability and data exchange for cross-border freight trains in a corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network (part of SMART RAIL)

2.3.2/17 Improvements in efficiency and service quality of the European wagon load system (part of SMART RAIL)

 


2.1.1/11 Transport information Agent for accessing the different ETIS

(European Transport policy Information System) data sources.

 

1. Problem description

The European Union and its Member States have a joint commitment to the principles of sustainable development in the transport sector and the European Union’s Common Transport Policy (CTP) serves as a framework for achieving it. The Common Transport Policy should be supported – among other things- by the establishment of a European Transport policy Information System (ETIS). ETIS will be an information system of integrated tools (decision support, modelling, presentation tools-GIS, databases etc.) to assist policy makers at European level to analyse European transport related strategic issues. There is a need to develop an appropriate tool-transport information agent-,  specialized on transport data and model applications that should enable these operations. Such a tool would be an important module of a European Transport policy Information System that will serve as a basis for transport planning and policy formulation.

ETIS agent will be a necessary separate interface that will enable the decomposition, processing and re-composition of the information, bringing an added value.

 

2. Task description

The European Transport policy Information System will be based on information flows coming from different sources.

The transport information agent will be the interface level of the ETIS between the user and the data sources. It will possess the following 5 characteristics:

- It will be a communication facilitator passing information to different information systems,

- It will have filtering capabilities in order to deal with confidential information,

- It will be capable of doing basic arithmetic operations,

- It will be an object-oriented information translator bridging information based on different platforms,

- It will be an integrator and compiler of various information elements.

A real prototype will be built that will process automated information flows on a case study that should link international/national/local information systems that serve nodal points of the European transportation network, i.e. airports, ports, intermodal transport interchange nodes, logistic centres and industrial actors. 

 

3. Expected results

Development of a software tool that should be tested in a pilot case study, linking and automatically processing data from selected transport information systems.  This tool will be the user key access to the ETIS system.

 

4. Type of contract

Accompanying Measure (up to 100% funding)

 

5. Timing/Duration

5th call/ 24 months

 

6. References

Communication on The Common Transport Policy, Sustainable mobility: “Perspectives for the Future (COM(1998)716 final)_Paras 36, ANNEX II, B.1”

 

7. Links

INFOSTAT, MESUDEMO, CONCERTO, BRIDGES, ASSEMBLING, TEST, MEST, (FP4 Transport program), SPOTLIGHTS, ATOM, 1st call of the 5th FP Sustainable mobility and Intermodality  key action, task 2.1.1/9 “Development of a European Transport policy Information System (ETIS) as a basis for transport planning and policy formulation” 3rd call 5th Sustainable mobility and Intermodality  key action, task 2.1.1/2 “Observatory of the performance of the European airport system. Assessment of the impact of air-traffic in the airports.5th call 5th Sustainable mobility and Intermodality key action

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Accession countries will have full access to the tools developed.

 

 9. Consortium profile

Public commercial organisations, Private commercial organisations, Universities, other research institutions.

 
2.1.1/12 Observatory of the performance of the European airport system. Assessment of the impact of air-traffic in the airports

 

1. Problem description

In recent years air transport recorded a strong growth in the volume of output produced and sold. Predictions are that total air transport demand in the European area will grow with an average 5-6% in the next two decades. A direct impact of this significant development is major congestion problems that will be aggravated in the years to come (e.g. bottlenecks in the air transportation system, delays at airports, safety problems, unreliable and inefficient intermodal connections). These problems are to a great extent due to insufficient airport capacity and/or to inefficient operation of the European airports network. Access to reliable and updated information on the performance of the airports and the parameters that affect this performance, could help the EU policy makers to decide upon new policies for addressing airport capacity utilisation, assessing development/investments decisions for airports, promoting and facilitating measures to interconnect with other modes of transportation and assessing the effects of the implementation of current rules on slots allocation. These policy issues are related to main European transport policies, namely, the creation of the Single European Sky, the completion of the liberalisation of the air transportation sector, the development of the Trans-European Transport Network all by ensuring Sustainable Development of Transportation.

 

The research work that took place in the 4th and 5th FP has concentrated on the  assembling of intermodal data (passengers and freight movements), the elaboration of origin/destination data as well as on studies that examined ways to integrate information and make it more accessible to users. The integration of the above data on a common system for the aviation sector could be visible through the establishment of an airport observatory at a pan-European level.

 

2. Task description

The role of an airport observatory is to enhance the organisation, sharing and exploitation of existing but disperse information.

The development of a network of airport observatories at a Europan level would enable policy makers and public servants have access to transport information such as:-O/D matrices-Geographical Information -Infrastructure data –Intermodal data-Environmental impacts – Performance Indicators - Connection to urban transportation modes.

Transport policy makers at the European level will be able to use the observatory as basic source before deciding upon new policies concerning: a) airport capacity utilisation b) airport performance c) investments on new airports, d) interconnection to other modes of transportation. e) investments in the infrastructure for a better operation of the intermodality network, f) utilisation of slots, g) land use planning h) airport surface access. This information will be used for the assessment of the overall network performance and efficiency.

The initial steps in this task should be:

- to assess the available transport information and identify the sources (by making use of existing results and by 

- to identify the information needed according to the user requirements being   described above,

- to define the framework under which the establishment and maintenance of the network of airport observatories will be feasible,

- to establish the network,

- to assess the state of the art whatever concerns the observatory layout, user interface and technologies used.

 

The results of the analysis phase should be directly implemented by establishing a network of airport observatories where different airports at a European level will be connected . This network of observatories, if successful, will be a prototype .

 

The proposal should take into account recent developments in the airports sector, namely, airport competition and airport privatisation.

 

3. Expected results

Establishment of a network of observatories linked to European airports.

Development of appropriate tools and methodologies.

The final aim is the assessment existing policies and the development of new initiatives with the aim to optimise airport capacity utilisation and by large the entire transportation network in Europe.

 

4. Type of contract

RTD project (up to 50% EU funding)

          

5. Timing/Duration

5th call/ 24 months

 

6. References

Communication on The Common Transport Policy, Sustainable mobility: “Perspectives for the Future (COM(1998)716 final)_Paras 13, 35,45,46, ANNEX I A.1, A.2, A.3, ANNEX II B.1, B.2, C.1, C.2”.

 

7. Links

INFOSTAT, DATELINE, (FP4 Transport program), sub-tasks 2&3 of task 2.1.1/9 “Development of a European Transport policy Information System (ETIS) as a basis for transport planning and policy formulation” 3rd  call 5th FP Sustainable mobility and Intermodality  key action, OPAL project  5th FP Sustainable mobility and Intermodality  key action

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Accession countries will have full access to the tools developed.

 

9. Consortium profile

Public commercial organisations, Private commercial organisations, Universities, other research institutions, airports. Other organisations/EU institutions involved should be Eurocontrol, ACI Europe, Eurostat.

 

 

 


2.1.2/9 The electronic revolution and its transport consequences

 

1. Problem description

The European Union has concerned itself with the development of electronic communications in Europe most notably at the Fiera European Council of June 2000 at which the Council and Commission presented a eEurope Action Plan.  The Action Plan is targeted to deliver in 2002, although it is recognised that some issues will remain to be resolved after that date.  In the domain of transport, the rapid advances in communication technology are providing a growing number of choices to transport users in answering their business and operational needs, as well as citizen's personal transport requirements.  There is much evidence of the broad effects of this new driver of transport, but the detailed effects of e-commerce and e-life in general on the transport chain (both the material chain and in the movement of passengers), including analysis of changes in the urban transport patterns and competitiveness of cities, and the analysis of mobility decision choices are not well understood.  The choice of transport mode now permits what some would term e-materialisation where goods formerly moved physically are shipped, at least in part, electronically.  The new technologies allow fundamental changes to be made in trade and business practices particularly e-commerce, e-work and e-shopping which alter the divisions and relativities within the transport chain.  In turn, transport patterns particularly in our cities and regions can be expected to be modified leading to a reorientation of the use of current infrastructure and the need for new infrastructure.  The consequences can also be expected to be reflected in changes to the hitherto conventional approach to that shippers, transport operators and individuals apply to their modal choices.

 

2. Task description

The task is divided into three interconnected parts.

 

Task 2.1.1/3a: an analysis of the change in the balance of the use of modes in reaction to e-commerce and e-life changes, with an analysis of the transfer from material modes to the alternatives involving electronic transfer or what could be termed and e-mode.  This analysis would include the full implications of changes in the transport chain estimated over the forthcoming decade up to 2010.  A number of case study examples would be expected to illustrate the changes.

 

Task 2.1.1/3b: an analysis of the changes that would be expected in the patterns of traffic in cities, and the effect that such changes might have on the competitiveness of cities.  In particular, impacts on the structure of the urban transport system, the modes of transport used and the temporal distribution of trips, as well as the amount of energy produced and the environmental pollution produced can be expected amongst other impacts.  This analysis would provide an insight on the changing use of transport (and related infrastructure) and would assist the planning of such resources over the decade up to 2010.

 

Task 2.1.1/3c: research into the key decision points and issues that form the basis of movement choice for freight and for passengers and can be expected to drive the future transport system.  The research should look into the business and commercial decision choices and the choices for the individual traveller.  Any consequences of the choice profiles deduced should be noted, particularly as they affect the research of Parts a & b above.

 

3. Expected results

Results would be grouped to provide:

·Firstly, from an initial phase to coincide with the eEurope initiative's target date of the year 2002.  For this element of the research, the research period would be considered to be 12 months after the commencement of the contract.

·Secondly, a consolidation of the full transport consequences of the electronic revolution that can be foreseen for the period up to the 2010 study period to be available at the conclusion of the full research period and presented for each of the parts a, b, and c above.

· 

In addition:

Results from part (a) would detail the impacts on modal split, including an e-mode.  The implications on the transport chain in freight transport and linked impacts on passenger transport would be provided.  Case studies would illustrate through examples where modal changes were to be found to be significant.

 

Results from part (b) would provide a time-based analysis and the impact of predicted changes to city transport resulting from the development of electronic communications and its consequent effects on patterns of behaviour of citizens in cities.  In particular:

·an overview of the knowledge and understanding of the issues involved;

·a detailed analysis involving a substantial number of both European and beyond Europe Case Studies;

·a validation of results through expert workshops (involving experts from Europe and from outside Europe)

would be expected.

 

Results from part (c) would detail the key points of decision on modal choice at the present time and the changing importance of these up to 2010, including any new decision opportunities identified.

 

4. Type of contract

Accompanying measure, contribution up to 100% of total costs

 

5. Duration

24 months, with a major output expected at 12 months

 

6. References

Communication on The Common Transport Policy, Sustainable mobility: “Perspectives for the Future (COM(1998)716 final);  New White paper on transport policy; New Green Paper on Urban Transport; eEurope Communications (COM (2000)  ????)

 

7. Links

5th Framework Programme - IST programme; current research on European transport futures - 5th FP and IPTS Futures 1 & 2 studies; project cluster on knowledge-based society impact on transport.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Accession Countries; countries with research Science and Technology Agreements with the EU.

 

9. Consortium

Small consortium of researchers in appropriate disciplines, supported by a group of end-users of the results.  Specific expertise for the development of methodologies for analysis should be included.

 


2.1.3/10 Use of revenues from transport pricing

 

1. Problem description

Efficient pricing, as put forward in the white paper Fair Payment for Infrastructure Use, aims to make the most efficient use of transport infrastructure through the establishment of a pricing system based on the marginal costs of usage. These costs include the so-called ‘direct costs’ - stemming from the different levels of wear and tear imposed by users - and ‘external costs’ like congestion, accidents, environmental damage and noise. Various research projects have estimated that the revenues from efficient pricing, when implemented to all modes of transport, are sufficient to cover investment needs of the transport sector as a whole. However, when it comes to individual modes, different regions and specific links or nodes of the networks, efficient pricing often leads to deficits or surpluses.

 

When efficient pricing does not suffice to cover the costs of socio-economically profitable transport investments, a modification of the charging system may be called for. This is especially the case for rail with high fixed investment costs and relatively low costs of use. Also roads and airports in sparsely populated regions of the EU as well as in accession countries are unlikely to recover all costs. On the other hand, in congested areas, typically urban areas, where possibilities to expand road capacity can be limited, efficient prices for road use can lead to considerable financial surpluses. At the same time, many cities face problems in funding extensions to the public transport system. In the air sector, surplus revenues from the busiest airports are sometimes used to cross-subsidise regional airports on the so-called ‘network basis’.

 

The white paper leaves the decisions of how to cover deficits and to use surpluses to the Member States on the basis of subsidiarity. The textbook solution is to cover the deficits from and to return the surpluses to the general budget. However, as in the end all taxation is more or less distortive, as perfect instruments do not exist, different national approaches might lead to further distortions within the transport sector but also in other areas of the economy. Also the citizens, for many reasons, do not feel that the textbook solution is fair or even efficient but often claim local use of revenues and application of the ‘beneficiary pays’ principle.

 

To date research has mainly looked at pricing principles for efficient use of the existing transport system and for internalising external costs. How to use surplus revenues or how to finance deficits, which might occur, has rarely if at all been looked at. Yet, the potential benefits of earmarking new or existing charges or taxes to specific investment projects or programmes or to be used locally where the money is collected have been raised in e.g. the UK, Germany or in Switzerland. Earmarking has also been identified as one prerequisite for public acceptance for new pricing measures, especially in the case of road pricing.

 

2. Task description

The task will consist of the following three parts:

(i)Development of a framework for linking pricing and taxation of the use of transport infrastructure to investments in transport based on welfare economic principles and public choice literature. The subtask should develop a sound framework for pricing and taxation rules that ensure efficient use of the transport system in the short run and that take into account the longer-term investment needs and strategies of the sector. It also brings together the work done in subtask (ii) and (iii).

 

(i)Assessment of the prerequisites and modalities for the creation and implementation of national and regional multimodal as well as unimodal transport investment funds. The emphasis of the subtask is on long distance transport networks.

 

(i)Development of efficient, fair and acceptable solutions for the use of revenues from integrated pricing strategies in cities, taking account of investment needs in the urban transport system.

 

The three subtasks should cover all individual transport modes as well as both freight and passenger transport. Pricing and financing of both links and nodes of the networks should be included. Earmarking of revenues as well as cross-funding between modes of transport and within an individual mode will be analysed. The research should analyse prevailing legal aspects and constraint and propose solutions in terms of legislative changes and effective institutional set-ups. The consequences to public-private-partnerships should also be assessed.

 

The socio-economic benefits and costs of the proposed frameworks should be assessed in a series of case studies, including a comparison between traditional budget financing and the different types of transport funds proposed. The case studies should be chosen to reflect the different investment requirements and revenue potential of the individual modes as well as the different geographical and other characteristics of the European countries and cities.

 

The task should actively liase with the thematic networks of the second call, viz. on Implementation of marginal cost pricing in transport (task 2.1.3/2 part b) and on Transalpine crossing (task 2.1.1/8).

 

3. Expected results

Solutions to combine pricing of the existing transport system and investments in transport infrastructure (financing). Concrete suggestions of how to finance the fixed cost of a certain transport project in different modes with least distortions and adverse distributional effects, these could include e.g. access charges in the form of two-part tariffs, regional cross-subsidies, inter-modal cross-subsidies, etc.

 

4. Type of contract

Accompanying measure (up to 100% EU funding).

 

5. Timing / Duration

5th call. 24 months.

 

6. References

White Paper on Fair Payment for Infrastructure Use: a Phased Approach to a Common Transport Infrastructure Charging Framework in the EU (COM/98/466 final 22.07.19998); Communication on the Common Transport Policy, Sustainable Mobility: Perspectives for the Future (COM(1998) 716 final), various references especially 15, 42, 10 on Fair and Efficient Pricing; High Level Group on Infrastructure Charging.

 

7. Links

AFFORD, CAPRI, COST342, PATS, PETS, PRIMA, TRENEN from the FP4 Transport Programme, UNITE, DESIRE, PROGRESS and CUPID from the first call and tasks 2.1.1/8, 2.1.2/4, 2.1.3/2, 2.1.2/5, 2.1.3/4 from the 2nd and 3rd calls of the FP5 key action Sustainable Mobility and Intermodality.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

The participation of the accession countries would be a clear benefit, especially to take into account the potentially different financing needs and possibilities due to their different transport systems and economic structures. Switzerland as well as some other European and non-European countries have also practical experience of transport funds, which could be of interest to the task.

 

9. Consortium profile

Academia and research institutes experienced in efficient pricing, financing issues as well as socio-economic assessment and with close links to infrastructure managers and operators and financing bodies in the field.

 


2.1.2/11 Institutional issues in transport policy implementation

 

1. Problem description

In the transport sector, institutional structures differ considerably with regards their relation with the different modes and European countries. Commercial provision of air, maritime and road transport services has existed since long, whereas for infrastructure both public and private provision co-exist. For rail, the process of separating infrastructure from operations and open access is still underdeveloped. Also very different decision-making structures and hierarchies prevail in the different European Union Member States and even more so in the accession countries, when it comes to defining and implementing policies that affect the transport system. Decisions on investments, subsidies and state aids, taxation, etc. can be made at the national, regional or local level and can involve several different Ministries and other authorities.

 

The differences in institutional structures can lead to distortions in competition, to lengthy lobbying processes and to unnecessary delays and modifications to the policy implementation unless effectively addressed already in the policy definition phase. Investment policies and cost recovery and subsidies of both infrastructure provision and operation are examples of areas where such distortions can occur. Problems can occur in modes where both the public and private sectors operate simultaneously, as is the case e.g. in the ports sector or for public transport in cities. Distortion to competition is possible also between regions and countries, e.g. when it comes to the implementation of transport pricing or to implementing measures to curtail green house gas emissions.

 

Better understanding of the underlying institutional structures will help to avoid these problems and to define more effective policy tools.

 

2. Task description

The objective of the task is to develop a framework and an analysis of the different roles of decision making governing bodies, cities and regions have in implementing transport policies and consequently in achieving a well functioning and efficient transport system.

 

The task should also examine and propose, from the point of view of definition and implementation of transport policy on a European scale, possible combinations of Member States and European actions that would best facilitate the implementation of transport policy.

 

The approach should consist of a thorough review of the system in place and of a series of case studies using examples from current European transport issues that cover all modes of transport and both passenger and freight transport. The analysis and case studies should have a strong focus on accession countries. Bodies associated with the public sector could well be involved.

 

3. Expected results

Better understanding of the implications and constraints of different organisational and regulatory settings and of the subsidiarity principle in reaching the objectives of transport policy.

 

4. Type of contract

Accompanying measure (up to 100% EU funding).

 

5. Timing / Duration

5th call. 24 months.

 

6. References

Communication on The Common Transport Policy, Sustainable Mobility: Perspectives for the Future (COM (1998) 716 final), various references especially paras 5, 8, 16, 44.

 

7. Links

AFFORD, CODE-TEN, POSSUM, TENASSESS, TRENEN from the 4th Framework Transport Research Programme. Tasks 2.1.2/5, 2.1.2/6, 2.1.2/7, 2.1.3/7 of the 3rd call of the FP5 key action Sustainable Mobility and Intermodality.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Given the different economic situations, transport systems and institutional settings in the accession countries and other Eastern European countries, participation of these countries is crucial.

 

9. Consortium profile

Academia and research institutes with experience in institutional and evolutionary economic and political sciences and with good knowledge of the political and policy making systems prevailing in the transport modes in the different European countries.

 

 


2.2.2/12 Scrappage Schemes for road and rail vehicles

 

1. Problem description

In the wake of the Auto-Oil II Programme and the Kyoto Protocol the Commission has launched a series of legislative and research actions to improve the environmental performance of the transport system, especially of the road fleet.  The present action will complete this set of projects in that it helps to shorten the time lag between new vehicle technologies entering in the market and their wide spread use. Changes in cost structures (such as gross increases in fuel cost), changes in life style or transport needs could provide reasons for vehicle owners to switch to more environmentally friendly ways of transport. For this to happen, information is essential, possibly accompanied by financial incentives to scrap badly performing vehicles. It is important to notice that this project will not deal with the scrappage technologies.

 

2. Task description

The project will analyse previous scrappage schemes (e.g. Denmark 1994/95, Greece 1991-93).  It will then develop and assess different designs of srappage schemes addressing the following topics:

·information and decision support tools for different groups of vehicle owners (private, fleet operators) in combination with Green Labelling of road vehicles on vehicle renewal

·market simulation model taking into account different cost structures for repair and purchase

·identification of potential conflicts with other policy objectives, e.g. road safety; vehicle life cycles

·bundling with related measures (e.g. combination with environmental zoning, fiscal measures)

·different (projected) fleet compositions, short term/long term, local, regional, global

·financing (tax reductions, bonuses, funds, private/public sources)

·setting of standards to which vehicles need to be repaired and maintained

·basis for financial incentive (e.g. scrappage of an old vehicle or purchase of a specific kind of new vehicle)[fj3] 

·timing (duration, identification of best point in time)

·verification/enforcement

·Co-operation of different levels of government and assignment of responsibilities

·Social acceptability of older vehicles

·legal, institutional issues including the role of different actors (motor industry, different levels of government, vehicle inspectorates, garages, touring clubs)

The parts of the assessment that are relevant to air pollution should be undertaken on a basis compatible to the Auto-Oil II assessment.

 

3. Expected results

·market simulation model

·decision support tool for vehicle owners

·best practice handbook

 

4. Type of contract

Accompanying Measure (up to 100% EC funding).

 

5. Timing / Duration

4th Call (June 2001), duration 24 months.

 

6. References

Auto-Oil II Programme

ECMT report (ECMT/CM(99)26/final of June 1999 ‘Conclusions and recommendations on scrappage schemes and their role in improving the environmental performance of the car fleet’

Environmental Management System (EMS), Green Accounting for shippers and hauliers, ISO 14001 for environmental management.

 

7. Links

Links should be established with the CLEANDER-DRIVE project developing environmental labelling for road vehicles

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Actors from central and Eastern European Countries should be involved.

 

9. Consortium profile

Transport economists, experts on rail and road vehicles.

 


2.2.3/14 New approach to railway safety management (part of SMART RAIL)

 

1. Problem description

Historically, rail transport in Europe has a good safety record compared to other modes of transport and with regard to achieved improvements over time. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that there are possibilities for significant improvements in railway safety management and that it should be possible to achieve a better value for money. The restructuring of the EU railways and the need to establish rail services across borders has led to a situation with much more interfaces between actors than in the past, and subsequently new sources of risks. The differences between Member States with regard to “safety philosophy”, operational rules and regulations, technical requirements, and certification procedures are causing problems for the interoperability in the European rail networks and for new third party train operators access to the railway infrastructure. The current system has several deficiencies:

Lack of explicit targets for safety. Without clear targets safety improvements may be difficult to achieve. Primary target: prevention of fatalities (and serious injuries).

Deficient accident reporting systems (differences in definitions of reportable accidents, variations between countries in the proportion of reportable accidents that actually are reported, UIC statistics are largely confidential). Incomplete picture of current level of safety and problem areas.

The activities in safety improvements are more often governed by emotional reaction after accidents than by cool and rational analysis.

It is doubtful whether installed safety measures are cost-effective (better effect on safety could have been achieved by alternative measures).

Little is known of the effectiveness of measures that have been implemented in the past. Lack of valid research and reluctance to publish results.

Traditional, rule-based safety management is essentially conservative and prevents new, innovative solutions.

 

The aim of this task is to establish networking and research activities that can ensure the necessary improvements in accordance with the needs outlined in the new directive on railway safety. Railway safety in the transport research programmes has so far mainly been dealt with in the projects under the ERTMS (European Rail Traffic Management System) umbrella. The activities in this task will be based on the results of that work, which mainly was done in the FP4 projects ACRUDA, HEROE and HUSARE. Apart from research efforts to be performed in order to elaborate solutions for a common European railway safety strategy, the involvement of all relevant stakeholders is crucial. Therefore a Thematic Network should cluster European research projects and those of Member States and international organisations, co-ordinate and promote the exchange of rail safety specific knowledge. The Thematic Network will identify and analyse the best practices, enhance consensus building and foster the implementation of research. Based on its results, it will identify where future research activities are required. Several Member States are in a situation of updating their rule books, and there is a good opportunity to reach a more harmonised approach which avoids duplications of work done by each individual Member State and enhances a higher level of interoperability of the liberalised European railways.

 

2. Task description

The work to be undertaken will be divided into two subtasks:

 

Subtask 1: Thematic Network on railway safety and interoperability

The Thematic Network should cover the following activities:

Bring together all relevant stakeholders in the field of railway safety, e.g. railway companies, national rail safety authorities and international organisations and groupings such as the international railway union (UIC), the Community of European Railways (CER), the union of railway industries (UNIFE), the European railway interoperability association (AEIF), the European Transport Safety Council (ETSC) and the International Liason Group of Government Railway Inspectorates (ILGGRI).

Identify the most promising results of safety related research activities and recommend which steps should be done in order to establish a new optimised safety approach.

Moderate a constructive dialogue and provide secretarial assistance with the aim of reaching consensus and agreements that can lead to harmonised European standards.

 

 

Subtask 2: Development of a new approach to railway safety management based on risk assessments, cost/benefit evaluation and a new approach to the use of rule books and safety regulations

The research/studies should cover the following activities:

Develop the new safety approach for railways by making use of elements known from other industies and other modes of transport (e.g. air) .

Develop methodologies for risk based and quantifiable safety assessment and conduct cost-benefit analyses.

Propose  acceptable levels of risk (setting of targets).

Definition of a proper accident  reporting system at the EU and national levels.

Common European activities related to the updating of the rule books based on current revisions in Member States. This should include an assessment of the role of rules and rule books in railway safety and recommendations for a common EU approach to unification of relevant rules (objective: minimum set of common rules)

Identification of best practise in terms of achieved safety level and costs.

 

3. Expected results

The research/study activities and the Thematic Network activities should result in achieving consensus on a new safety approach on a European level and assist in the development of of technical interoperability specifications (TSI) as far as safety aspects are concerned. This could cover the following:

A European railway safety policy statement and the role and responsibility of each player in the railway industry. Guidelines for risk analysis and for assessing the impacts of potential safety measures (impacts on safety, cost, mobility, environment, etc). Guidelines for an EU accident reporting system and database including accessibility to accident data Proposals for defining acceptable levels of risks. Assessment of the role of rules in rail safety and recommendations for a common approach to unification of relevant rules (objective: minimum set of common rules). Concise suggestions for a minimum set of common rules, approved by the Thematic Network, suitable for implementation in the various national rule books.

A handbook outlining best practice in cost efficient safety and input to future research activities should be submitted.

 

4. Type of contract

Subtask 1: Thematic Network (up to 100% funding) 

Subtask 2: Accompanying Measure (up to 100% funding)

 

The two subtasks will be subject to two different contracts.

          

5. Timing/Duration

Subtask 1: 4th call (June 2001) / 36 months

Subtask 2: 4th call (June 2001) / 24 months

 

6. References

The Railway Infrastructure Package, COM (1999) 616.

The Directive 96/48 on interoperability in the European high-speed rail network.

The communication/draft directive on interoperability in the European conventional rail network, COM (1999) 617.

The new directive on railway safety.

 

7. Links

FP4 Transport Programme projects: ERTMS, HEROE, HUSARE, ACRUDA, REMAIN.

DG Energy and Transport policy study: “Railway Safety Regulation at European Level”.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Switzerland and Central and Eastern Europe.

 

9. Consortium profile

Subtask 1:

A secretariat established by a small group of organisations/institutes able to organise and co-ordinate stakeholder, cluster and expert group meetings by involving a number of “members” and experts from the group of stakeholders mentioned under point 2 above.

 

Subtask 2:

A consortium of consultants, universities and other research institutions with good experience in the task subjet, combined with railway supply industry, railway operators, railway infrastructure managers and railway safety authorities.

 

The same group of companies/organisations may apply for both subtasks.


2.2.3/15 Methodology to collate flight/operational and human factors data to improve safety trend analysis within the air transport system

 

1. Problem description

Trend analysis using an incident database is currently one of the main sources of identification of air transport system deficiencies and weaknesses. The aviation databases, as currently realised, do not completely provide an integration between all “aircraft system” data (i.e., aircraft data, operational data, environmental data, crew and/or human factors data).

On the other hand, the recognition of the “human factors” as primary or contributing factors in above 80% of aviation accidents and incidents calls for a development of a database that collates all the above described types of data, and permits the development of new kind of trend analyses for the identification of the weaknesses of the air transport system and human operator as a whole, including the human factors and human-machine interactions issues.

 

2. Task description

The objective of the task is to develop new methodologies and models (taxonomies) to attempt to correlate aircraft/operational data (e.g. FDR data) and human factors data, and develop corresponding analysis methods to identify causal factors which lead to accidents and incidents.

These methodologies and analysis methods should be sufficiently “objective” and “easy to implement”, in order that, in the longer term, non-specialised personnel or developers of the database could be able to assemble data and to develop trend analysis through the database.

 

A great issue concerning the development of such a database is the identification and the gathering of appropriate data to input to the database.

For this reason, the development of flight/operational and HF data collation methodologies and analysis methods would need to be carried out in parallel with the identification of the data gathering and manageability procedures.

A careful analysis of other works that are in progress on this concern should be also conducted.

 

3. Expected results

New methodologies and models to correlate aircraft/operational data (e.g. FDR data) and human factors data and corresponding analysis methods to identify causal factors which lead to accidents and incidents.

 

4. Type of contract   

RTD project (up to 50% EU funding).

 

5. Timing / Duration     

4th call (June 2001), 3 year duration.

 

6. References

Communication on The Common Transport Policy, Sustainable mobility: Perspectives for the Future (COM (1998) 716 final) Paras 19,20,21,30,33,45,48

 

7. Links

Human Factors related projects from DG-TREN particularly Ecottris, Jartel and Essai, and JAA studies. ECC-AIRS and Eucare data sources.

 

8. Involvement of non EU-countries

As appropriate

 

9. Consortium profile

Airlines, research centres, manufacturers, certification authorities

 


2.2.4/2 Establishment of harmonised security and safety procedures for freight intermodal transport operations.

 

 

1. Description of the problem and task objectives :

Security for the transport of goods in ITUs (Intermodal Transport Units) is a major problem for transporters, either when transporting the goods (on different transport means), when crossing borders, or when leaving the ITU’s for short term or long term storage inside terminals. This perceived lack of security reduces the attractiveness of intermodal transport. In addition, the different rules and practices that are used in the individual transport modes create extra burdens when a door-to-door intermodal service is concerned.

 

These differences are also a problem for safety. This is a major issue for citizens and for the protection of the environment especially when moving dangerous goods in  transport operations or in terminals.

 

The main objective of this task is to harmonise security procedures for intermodal transport operations and to promote the organisation and implementation of security measures on door to door transport chains as well as early warning and cargo security systems.  Secondly, the objective is to harmonise safety procedures when using intermodal transport.

 

2. Task description

The task is divided in 2 parts:

 

Part 1 : state of the art

Inventory and assessment of existing data on problems (incidents and accidents) linked to security and safety. The review of existing procedures, either public or private, when using intermodal/combined transport (for the movement of goods with ITUs and when moving the goods inside the ITUs) should be done.  The characteristics of individual modes should be taken into account.

 

Part 2: developing new approaches

Establishment of harmonised safety and security procedures for the transport of ITUs and other consignments in intermodal transport. A general methodology should also be developed for apprehending such problems in order to organise safety and security measures on door to door transport chains (including the terminals).

 

This will be supported, via demonstrators, by the implementation of automatic detection systems for security problems and alarm systems for safety problems

 

Concerning security problems, the main aim is to improve the security of ITUs against theft and damages either inside terminals or during the transport.

 

Concerning safety problems, the research should focus on national approval procedures for containers and swap bodies with the aim to harmonise them in the framework of relevant conventions, such as CSC (Container Safety Convention) and UIC rules.  Requirements associated with the transport of dangerous goods on the transport networks and inside terminals should be clearly addressed together with operational aspects and human factors.

 

 

3. Expected results

Recommendations and tools to establish higher levels of security when using intermodal transport recognised and accepted at European level.

Development and demonstration of harmonised safety and security procedures and regulations for freight transport.

 

The task outcome is of particular importance for shippers, operators, end users, national authorities and citizens.

 

4. Type of contract

Combined project.

 

5. Timing

Second call, duration : 18 months

 

6. References

Work programme – subtask 2.2.3

 

7. Links

None

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Participation of CEEC, particularly accessions countries.

 

9. Consortium profile

Research institutes, consultants, intermodal transport operators and main transport actors involved in the subject for the research part. Industry, intermodal operators for the demonstration part. International organisation, standardisation bodies for the dissemination part

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


2.2.5/8 Strengthening the professional knowledge of local and regional transport planners

 

1. Problem description

The professional knowledge and competences required from persons responsible for planning and management of local and regional transport systems is changing rapidly. The results of Commission sponsored research projects in the field of urban transport and energy efficiency are at the forefront of developments, for instance in areas such as clean and efficient vehicles, public transport organisation, mobility management and marketing, intelligent transport systems and economic instruments.

Community research results play an increasingly important role in the development of policies and related research activities at local, regional and national level. Transferring knowledge from Community research, and the policy context of this research, can therefore strengthen the link with research and policy activities at local, regional and national level. 

 

2. Description of task

A broad approach and coherent is needed to reach the different actors in the sector. The idea behind this task is to develop a mechanism that directly addresses senior managers working in local/regional authorities and transport operators.

The objective of this task is to develop a training programme consisting of a yearly series of four 3-day seminars, each seminar focusing on a limited number of topics. Latest results of Community research should be the starting point for the teaching material, and should be presented by the researchers involved in the relevant research projects.

A selection procedure should be established. A group of maximum 30 participants will be selected each year with the help of an external advisory committee. After the first year, the programme will be re-run (and further developed) for two further consecutive years.

 

3. Expected results

A well targeted training programme of four 3-day seminars per year at different locations in Europe, aimed at senior managers working at local and regional authorities and transport operators;

Starting point is a user-needs assessment, which will form the basis for the selection of the contents of the seminars;

A set of teaching-materials targeted at this specific user group, building upon the most advanced knowledge gathered through research and developed in co-operation with relevant research projects from the energy and the transport programmes;

A highly visible information campaign and selection procedure of candidates.

 

4. Type of contract

Accompanying measure, contribution up to 70% (?) of the total costs. The Commissions’ contribution could cover the organisational costs of the seminars (course materials, speakers, venues) plus a modest contribution to the travel and subsistence costs of the seminar participants. 

 

 

5. Timing

4th call, foreseen duration: 36 months.

 

6. References

Key action work programme: subtask 2.2.5 (Human factors).

 

7. Links

A wide approach is needed to disseminate research results to the different actors in the local and regional transport sector. Besides this new task, two other ongoing activities are relevant: the PORTAL project (development of project-based teaching materials for leading European educational institutions), and the new thematic network on public transport (dissemination of project results through networks of operators and authorities and the internet).

 

8. Third countries

The seminars should aim at participants from both EU and Accession Countries. However, if a clear specific demand can be identified, each year a separate parallel series could be run that is specifically targeted at participants from Accession Countries.

 

9. Consortium profile

It is expected that a small group of organisations experienced in developing and running educational programmes will constitute the core of the consortium. Proposals must include evidence of support by public and private stakeholders from the sector in order to ensure a user-driven approach.


2.3.1/21 Intelligent shipping operations

 

1. Problem Description

Technological developments have a tremendous impact on society, among others, new forms of business and trade (b2b/e-commerce) are making their way into daily life. Transport and shipping have always been a support for trade and in particular for international trade. Hence, shipping has to adapt its operations to fit into the new business environment requirements.

 

Several aspects have to be addressed in order to adapt shipping operations to this new reality. Firstly, the documentation that supports the cargo transactions needs to be integrated with traffic management, terminal and ship operation.

 

Secondly, the possibilities offered by these new technologies for increased automation of command, control, alarm and information functions have to be exploited. In particular, new sensor technology together with new applications has improved the possibilities to anticipate and detect malfunctions, changes in performance, loading conditions etc.

 

As an example, in the ship, the integrated ship control concept provides the conceptual standard and platform for the integration, organisation and display of all viable information to the operator for actual decision-making, partly supported by decision support tools or expert systems.

 

Aspects to be further addressed are the actual reliability and standardisation of  systems (modules) and interfaces as well as the quality of information in order to ensure safety, efficient performance, interoperability and compatibility of equipment and procedures. However, some significant results in this respect have been already achieved in European RTD projects as well as by the industry and are either commercially exploited or currently dealt with at international standardisation bodies.

 

Nevertheless, it seems that the application potential of existing or emerging technologies is by far not fully exploited, it still lacks a visionary view in order to determine future applications for more efficient and safe, i.e. intelligent shipping operations. Possibilities are seen in the combination and application of automation and new information technologies, accurate positioning systems and cargo-related information and procedures in integrated solutions that fit into the new trade and business requirements.

 

2. Task Description

To provide an advanced view and future perspectives on ‘intelligent shipping operations’ (high-quality, safe and efficient) that meet societal demands through the cost-effective and efficient application and integration of both enabling information and communication technologies, automation solutions and harmonised procedures.

 

To assess the user requirements for the integration of the cargo and transport-related information.

 

To assess the full potential of new technologies in view of further automation of shipping operations and maintenance, under normal conditions (navigation and port operations) and in case of emergency situations.

 

To assess the potential of linking shipborne information and communication systems with shore-based management and information systems using new technologies in order to improve overall shipping operations and integrate them into the overall transport operation.

 

3. Expected Results

State of the art

Technology assessment and forecast

User requirements

Concepts and harmonised procedures for integration

Identification and validation of new applications in operational scenarios

Cost/benefit analysis

Business and exploitation plans

Identification of  socio-economic impacts

Identification of specific familiarisation and training needs

 

4. Type of contract

RTD (up to 50%)

 

5. Timing

5th Call - June 2001, Duration: 30 months


2.3.1/20 Demonstration of new approach to timetable planning and slot allocation in a corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network (part of SMART RAIL)

 

1. Problem description

Timetable planning and slot allocation is essential in an efficient operation of rail freight services. In line with the new railway infrastructure package, the area of timetable planning and slot allocation has come to the foreground as a very important aspect in the promotion of rail freight services on both national and international scale. Moreover, in the development of trans-European railway services, the adjustment and compatibility of various timetables are crucial to offering a competitive freight service. The importance of this issue is recognised by the main stakeholders (including the UIC/CER and the Forum Train Europe, FTE – the former timetable conferences), and the ideas of an improved approach for reserving capacity for freight trains has been developed.

 

A number of interesting technologies and solutions have been developed in FP4 and FP5 transport research projects. One strand of research is the work done in the trio of projects EUROPE-TRIS, EUROPE-TRIP and EUROPE-TRIO. The EUROPE-TRIS project has brought forward ideas on using teleconferencing to adjust the timetables say every month instead of once or twice per year. Another strand of activities is the work done on the European Traffic Management Layer of ERTMS as defined in the OPTIRAILS and OPTIRAILS II projects. The ERTMS work does not include the time-table planning and the short term addition of extra trains to the timetable. Instead the ERTMS Traffic Management Layer as developed in the  OPTIRAILS and OPTIRAILS II projects focus on real-time traffic management, re-allocation problems and data exchange in European corridors. A common demonstrator for the ERTMS Traffic Management Layer and the new approach to timetable planning and slot allocation in the present task should be considered, but is should be emphasised that it is a requirement for the present task that the solutions should function both on lines equipped with ERTMS and on lines without ERTMS.

 

The aim of this task is to demonstrate how the new approach for timetable planning and slot allocation requested in the railway infrastructure package can be achieved by using the technologies and methods developed in European research projects. The focus should be on ensuring cross-border slots for freight trains with higher priority than passenger trains. This includes the adding of timetable trains with a shorter notice than the traditional timetables (1 year ahead), and for adding extra "one-off" trains at short notice provided that capacity is available.

 

2. Task description

In order to achieve a successful demonstration of a new approach for timetable planning and slot allocation, a number of sequential steps need to be taken:

At first existing timetable planning and slot allocation will be described. The reason for doing this is to get a grip on the existing problems of co-ordinating different systems across borders. A SWOT-analysis is to be made of current practices/mechanisms for timetable planning and slot control. Areas of attention will include elements of punctuality (value of punctuality to shipper vs. passenger) and operational functionality (interface between time table planning mechanisms and train operation in operational circumstances, such as in the case of overriding/priority conflicts). In this step the potentials for improvement are investigated and concluded.

Secondly, based on the conclusions of the first step, a functional analysis of potential new approaches for timetable planning and slot allocation will be carried out. Elements that will be dealt with in this step are: priority setting relating to passenger traffic and perhaps within freight transport, flexibility parameters (time required to enter), scenario’s on amount of traffic and deviations on arrival patterns, and last minute adding of single non scheduled trains. Furthermore, practices or mechanisms used by competing modes of transport will be analysed for their suitability in rail freight transport. Other requirements such as traction and crew availability will also be included in the analysis. 

Thirdly, based on the functional analysis a software tool will be developed (or existing tools modified) in such as way that they can help in evaluating new approaches of timetable planning and slot allocation. These tool needs to be tested against an actual, present situation, as well as on predictable future situations. The suitability of the tool for international implementation should also be addressed.  

Fourthly, based on the experience gained in developing and using the software tool, feed back on railway infrastructure directives will be defined, as well as a description of relevant and marketable products.

 

The demonstration of the use in an international corridor should be focused on also dealing with the organisational and cooperation problems between the relevant stakeholders along the corridor.

 

This task is part of as a cluster of demonstration projects together with the task 2.3.1/x “Demonstration of solutions for improved service reliability and data exchange for cross-border freight trains in a corridor of the trans-European Rail Freight Network” and the task 2.3.2/x “Improvements in efficiency and service quality of the European wagon load system”. Each of these three tasks are meant to be subject of a separate proposal, but coordinated proposals covering two or maybe all three tasks with demonstrations in the same corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network is strongly welcomed.

  

3. Expected results

A demonstrator that could set standards for other corridors in the practical implementation of the directive(s) in the new railway infrastructure package, in particular with regard to the organisational aspects and cooperation between relevant stakeholders along the corridor.

Feed back to future revisions of the railway infrastructure directives.

A potential user group could be established to carry out extended trials of the potential capacity and financial benefits of the package.

 

4. Type of contract

Combined project (RTD+DEMO up to 50 % EU funding).

          

5. Timing/Duration

4th call (June 2001) / 24 months

 

6. References

The Railway Infrastructure Package, COM (1999) 616.

The communication/draft directive on interoperability in the European conventional rail network, COM (1999) 617.

 

7. Links

FP4 Transport Programme projects: ERTMS, OPTIRAILS, EUROPE-TRIP, LIBERAIL.

FP4 Telematics Application Programme project: MARCO, EUROPE-TRIS, EUROPE-TRIO

FP5 1st call project: OPTIRAILS II

FP5 Thematic Networks on “Rail Freight Services” (1st call, RAILSERV) and “Maintenance and Management of Railway Infrastructure” (1st call, PROMAIN).

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Switzerland and Central and Eastern Europe.

 

9. Consortium profile

A consortium of consultants, universities and other research institutions with a strong experience in the task subject, combined with railway supply industry, railway operators, railway infrastructure managers, rail regulators and international organisations.

owners, and railway supply industry.

 

 

 

 

 

 


2.3.2/16 Demonstration of solutions for improved service reliability and data exchange for cross-border freight trains in a corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network (part of SMART RAIL)

 

1. Problem description

Railways in Europe have developed along national lines. Each railway has still its own technical standards, equipment, safety rules and operational procedures.  Technical and operational norms are not harmonised. A freight haul from north to south or east to west will encounter widely varying rules and conditions at each border crossing.  Today, for instance, a haul from Sweden to Spain will involve six different railways.  And the related production and sales effort for the trip will involve direct contacts between colleagues in the originating country Sweden and those in  Denmark, Germany, Belgium, France and Spain. Border delays are common as a consequense of weak interconnections, poor matching of timetables, necessity for the change of locomotives, and duplication of physical inspections. Exchange of information is still slow and data systems cannot effectively communicate with one another. Slot allocation problems are still existing for freight. At the same time there exists  a gap between quality needs and economical capability of intermodal operators. Difficulties exist to new operators in gaining access to the infrastructure.

 

With many operators and technical systems involved, it is complex and costly for railways to operate across frontiers.  This is an obstacle not only for the development of pan European rail freight services but also for the future enlargement of the EU and connections to CEEC.

 

Technical solutions exists but the implementation is slow and there has been an insufficient focus on improving the basic business processes. Among the examples of improvements can be mentioned: 

Some of the strategic co-operation and partnerships that has been established such as the Pan-European transport service provided by RAILION which was formed through the merger of NS Cargo and DB Cargo and the results of the work on establishing trans-European Rail Freight Freeways (e.g. the North-South Freight Freeways and the BELIFRET freightway linking Netherlands, Luxembourg, France, Spain and Italy, which offers international high speed paths, elimination or reduction of border stops, and a One-Stop-Shop  - a single negotiator for international service).

Possibility to use some of the experiences from cooperation on high-speed passenger operations in Europe.

Results available from UIC East-West Task Force studies on border-crossings can be used as an input or benchmark.

New possibilties of use internet based solutions. For exaple good practice of BOLERO project for data security and internet based exchange from field of banking and insurance.

TEDIM projects at Finnish - Russian border prove how means of telematics and e-business can facilitate railway operations and border crossing procedures between EU and non-EU country.

Channel Tunnel intermodal service providers that offer combinations of both shuttle and hub & spoke services.  Innovation and strategic partnerships are the key to success

FIRE (Freight Information in a Railway Environment) which has resulted in 20 smart wagons operating throughout Europe and a service provider for consignment information about position and delays.

 

The aim of this task is in line with the interoperability directive for conventional rail and in line with the conclusions from the study on data exchange in cross-border rail freight traffic to …

 

The activities in this task will be a demonstration of the integration of the solutions developed in FP4 and FP5 transport research projects. In particular the ERTMS and OPTIRAILS I and II projects, and the FIRE and CESAR projects. But the solutions should also take into account the experiences made in the TEN-T supported TEDIM programme. Inspiration can also be taken from the development of the North American railways and how the co-operation between railways and eventually the set up of an external service provider had an significant impact on the current commercial success of North American railways. While European rail freight traffic has been struggling, US and Canadian railways have performed very well in freight operations.  The RAILINC experience (a company operated by US railways using customer oriented information services) is a case in point.  Information is provided free to railway customers through the mandatory exchange of data between American railways based on a simple set of data interchange protocols. 

 

A consensus on solutions is needed among all stakeholders in the railway sector (large freight rail owners and operators, ‘short lines’, customers, fleet owners/mangers, regulators etc) in order to make international freight traffic in Europe commercially viable.  Rail freight must be integrated into the entire logistics chain so that it can assert itself in the competitive global trade environment.  Demonstrations of improved service reliability and data exchange in a selected multi-national European corridor is a good starting point.

 

2. Task description

Develop improved solutions for reliable arrival forecasting for cross-border rail freight services, e.g. by making use of data from ERTMS.

Demonstration of a freight data exchange solutions along one European corridor (covering the major railway operators, shortlines as well as the interfaces to transport management systems and to the ERTMS). The focus should be on demonstrating possibilities for improving service reliability and for providing effective e-business solutions. 

Facilitating best practice identified in TEDIM program. The main development areas in TEDIM Programme are border-crossing projects dealing with methods and documents to facilitate customs operations and railway waybill transfer, logistics management projects creating a common approach for delivery management and monitoring of goods and logistic network projects dealing with data transfer and management between companies and developing document procedures with authorities. One of the most important objectives of TEDIM is to increase the use of electronic data transfer and at the same time to create new operational methods called for by solutions to be introduced.

 

This task is part of as a cluster of demonstration projects together with the task 2.3.1/x “Demonstration of new approach to timetable planning and slot allocatition in a corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network” and the task 2.3.2/x “Improvements in efficiency and service quality of the European wagon load system”. Each of these three tasks are meant to be subject of a separate proposal, but coordinated proposals covering two or maybe all three tasks with demonstrations in the same corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network is strongly welcomed.

 

3. Expected results

Expected results must directly relate to the task and must enhance the international rail freight services in the medium run. Results that can be identified are e.g. as follows:

Validated technical solutions, including a validation of the interfaces to ERTMS and the interfaces to transport management systems;

Provide a starting point for a possible follow-up activity (if consensus can be reached) with regard to establish a European service provider similar to “RAILINC” in North America.

Demonstrators that can set standards for other corridors in the practical implementation of the directive(s) in the new railway infrastructure package.

Demonstrators or best-practice solutions for efficient cross-border procedures for freight trains, including customs procedures and technical procedures (e.g. changing of locos and/or crew).

Demonstrators or best-practice examples for streamlined business processes and improved customer services with the help of automatic data exchange across parties involved in the transport chain and across borders.

Examples of improved models of co-operation and organisation of international rail freight services, including solutions for increase the access for shortlines in feeder services.

Preliminary specifications for marketable products (software and systems) that aid the management and customer services of international rail freight operations.

Workshops and seminars, where best-practice solutions, demonstrations and improved models for co-operation and organisation are presented.

 

4. Type of contract

Combined project (RTD+DEMO up to 50 % EU funding).

          

5. Timing/Duration

4th call (June 2001) / 24 months

 

6. References

The Railway Infrastructure Package, COM (1999) 616.

The communication/draft directive on interoperability in the European conventional rail network, COM (1999) 617.

 

7. Links

FP4 Transport Programme projects, rail: ERTMS, OPTIRAILS, HEROE, EUROPE-TRIP, LIBERAIL, FIRE, HISPEEDMIX, EUFRANET, INTELFRET.

FP4 Transport Programme projects, intermodal: INTRARTIP, ITESIC, LOGICAT, OCTOPUS, CESAR.

FP4 Telematics Application Programme project: EUROPE-TRIS.

FP5 1st call projects: OPTIRAILS II, Thematic Network on “Rail Freight Services” (RAILSERV), THEMIS, CESAR II.

TEN-T supported programme: TEDIM

DG Energy and Transport policy study : “Data exchange for cross-border freight trains”

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Switzerland and Central and Eastern Europe.

 

9. Consortium profile

Consultants and research institutes with a strong experience in the task subject. National and regional authorities (i.e. customs, phytosanitary and veterinary), intermodal transport operators, terminal operators, railways, forwarders and shipping line agents share the strongest role in the consortium profile. International organisations and other relevant bodies for the dissemination part.

 


2.3.2/17 Improvements in efficiency and service quality of the European wagon load system (part of SMART RAIL)

 

1. Problem description

The European wagon load system is the core of rail freight traffic. Wagon-load is based on transportation of single wagons (or group of wagons) between sidings to industrial sites and a transfer utilising the European wagon-load network. The long haulage is as far as possible done by direct trains between marshalling yards. Around 50 % of all rail freight traffic is wagon-load. New solutions from research projects e.g. with regard to intelligent freight trains (FP4 project INTELFRET) makes it possible to significantly improve the European wagon load system.

 

The aim of this task is develop and demonstrate solutions for improvements of the European single wagon load system in line with the Railway Infrastructure Package, the Trans-European Rail Freight Network, the communication on rail freight, and the recommendations from the policy study on “single wagon load rail traffic”. The development work and the demonstration activities will continue the work that has been started on intelligent freight trains in the FP4 project INTELFRET, on dedicated rail freight networks in the FP4 project EUFRANET and on new bundling concepts (train coupling and sharing) in the FP4 projects IMPULSE and TERMINET.

 

2. Task description

Develop software applications/tools to optimise the European wagon load system from a European perspective (e.g. by optimising frequencies of links between marshalling yards, maximum lengths of trains for European rather than national reasons, tackling of cross-border issues). The tools should be prepared in such a way that they can support the efforts by train operators on implementation of modular trains at European scale, and it should support the efforts on establishing a new European rail service (between the single wagon and the full train) and on improving the turnover of wagons (on an international scale). The tools should also include the optimisation of the loading plan in order to optimise the wagon’s use. 

Demonstrate the use of intelligent freight trains (modular freight trains with improved brake systems, data exchange along the train and automatic couplers) to support new operational concepts (based on the recommendations from the INTELFRET project) and by using new train bundling concepts/train coupling and sharing (based on the developments in the IMPULSE and TERMINET projects). This should in particular look into the possible synergies between the wagonload system and intermodal transport in order to operate trains with mixed wagonload and intermodal traffic, wherby the transport volumes could be increased and unit costs reduced.

Develop and demonstrate improved possibilities for shortlines to work as an integrated part of the wagon load system (in particular in feeder services).

Develop and demonstrate the possibilities for establishing a performance regime for the European wagonload system (e.g. demonstration for a corridor in the Trans-European Rail Freight Network, use of weekly performance indicators and "score cards" similar to U.S. freight railways).

Develop solutions to reduce the number of empty return runs. Finding solutions for offering return runs at lower prices than the normal tarifs.

 

This task is part of as a cluster of demonstration projects together with the task 2.3.1/x “Demonstration of new approach to timetable planning and slot allocation in a corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network” and the task 2.3.1/x “Demonstration of solutions for improved service reliability and data exchange for cross-border freight trains in a corridor of the trans-European Rail Freight Network”. Each of these three tasks are meant to be subject of a separate proposal, but coordinated proposals covering two or maybe all three tasks with demonstrations in the same corridor of the Trans-European Rail Freight Network is strongly welcomed.

 

3. Expected results

Software tools for optimisation of the wagon load system.

Demonstration of the use of intelligent vehicles and improved fleet management to increase efficiency and improve service quality.

Ideas on how shortlines can be integrated for feeder services (for discussion with the involved stakeholders in the Thematic Network on rail freight services).

A potential user group could be established to carry out extended trials of the potential capacity and financial benefits of the package.

 

4. Type of contract

Combined project (RTD+DEMO up to 50 % EU funding).

          

5. Timing/Duration

4th call (June 2001) / 24 months

 

6. References

The Railway Infrastructure Package, COM (1999) 616.

The communication/draft directive on interoperability in the European conventional rail network, COM (1999) 617.

Communication on rail freight.

 

7. Links

FP4 Transport Programme projects: INTELFRET, EUFRANET, IMPULSE, TERMINET.

FP5 Thematic Network on “Rail Freight Services” (1st call, RAILSERV).

DG Energy and Transport policy study: Single wagonload rail traffic.

 

8. Involvement of non-EU countries

Switzerland and Central and Eastern Europe.

 

9. Consortium profile

A consortium of consultants, universities, universities and other research organisations/institutes with a strong experience in the task subject, combined with train operators, rolling stock leasing companies/private wagon owners, and railway supply industry.

 

 

 

 

 

 


ANNEX

 

LIST OF TASK

 

1st CALL. MARCH 1999

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THESE TASKS ARE NOT OPEN


LIST OF TASKS

1st CALL. MARCH 1999

Objective 2.1  Socio-economic scenarios for mobility of people and goods

2.1.1       Quantitative tools for decision-making

2.1.1/1    Testing of methodologies for long distance passenger travel data

2.1.1/2   Transport network accounts and marginal costs in relation to fair payment for infrastructure use

2.1.1/3    Thematic network on policy and project evaluation methodologies

2.1.1/4    Understanding and predicting mobility trends and transport patterns

2.1.1/5    Transport Modelling and Exploration Tools

2.1.1/6    Analysis of the cost structure of door-to-door intermodal freight transport services and the conditions to optimise it.

2.1.1/7    Thematic network on Benchmarking in transport

2.1.2       Driving forces in transport

2.1.2/1    Effects on Transport of Trends in Logistics and Supply Chain Management

2.1.2/2    Role of third party logistics service providers and their impact on transport

2.1.2/3    Influencing transport intensity of economic growth

2.1.3       Policies for sustainable mobility

2.1.3/1    Changing legal and organisational frameworks in local public transport: assessing the impacts on roles and activities of key players  

Objective 2.2  Infrastructures and their interfaces with transport means and systems

2.2.1       Infrastructure development and maintenance

2.2.1/1    Integration between local and regional rail, incl. cross-border aspects

2.2.1/2   Improvement of cross-border connections for local and regional passenger transport

2.2.1/3    Optimisation of the use of semitrailers in the intermodal transport chain

2.2.1/4    Thematic Network on freight transfer points and terminals

2.2.1/5    Integration of horizontal transhipment techniques in intermodal transport operations

2.2.1/6    Total Airport Optimisation by Simulation, including land-side

2.2.1/7    Thematic Network on maintenance and management of railway infrastructure

2.2.1/8    Condition based, and reliability centred, maintenance of railway infrastructure

2.2.1/9    Automated underground distribution and tube transportation systems

2.2.2       Environment

2.2.2/1    Thematic network on transport and the environment

2.2.2/2    Monitoring emissions from transport, including particulates

2.2.2/3    In-service Test Procedures for Road Vehicle Emissions

2.2.2/4    Thematic network on the integration of new generation vehicles into the transport system

2.2.2/5    Tools and strategies for reduced source noise and vibrations from trains


2.2.3       Safety

2.2.3/1    Cost/benefit analysis of regulations and investments to optimise air transport safety

2.2.3/2    Improve the regulatory framework for the implementation of new operational concepts and technologies in air transport

2.2.3/3    Thematic Network on Safety Assessment in Waterborne Transport      

2.2.3/4                Cost-efficient integration of new safety technologies to improve Quality Shipping

2.2.3/5    Thematic Network on Cost/Benefit and Cost-Effectiveness Assessment Tools for Road Safety/Environment Measures.

2.2.3/6    Further Development of Road Vehicle Safety Standards

2.2.3/7    Drivers' and Riders' Physical Fitness and Physical State.

2.2.4       Security

2.2.4/1    Security in local and regional public transport

2.2.5       Human factors

2.2.5/1   Training to improve the safety of air transport operations

2.2.5/2   Driver Training and Hazard Perception

2.2.5/3   Thematic Network on Maritime Education, Training and Certification

2.2.5/4   Promoting the take up of project results by leading educational institutions

Objective 2.3  Modal and intermodal transport management systems

2.3.1       Traffic management systems

2.3.1/1    Extension of ERTMS System specification

2.3.1/2   The definition and management of a master plan for ATM validation

2.3.1/3    Full Airport A-SMGCS Test Trial

2.3.1/4   Assessment of User Needs for Traffic Information and Traffic Management and their Reaction to Methods of Information Provision.

2.3.1/5   Enhanced Road Traffic Simulation for Transport Strategy Assessment.

2.3.1/6   Implementation scenarios and impact assessment of advanced driver assistance systems

2.3.1/7                Thematic Network for the creation of an intermodal framework for freight transport information and management services.

2.3.1/8   Designs for inter-urban road pricing schemes 

2.3.1/9    Testing the effectiveness and acceptance of urban pricing schemes

2.3.1/10  Thematic Network on Waterborne Traffic Management and Information Services

2.3.2       Transport and mobility services

2.3.2/1    Thematic Network on rail freight services

2.3.2/2    Innovative Waterborne Transport  Concepts

2.3.2/3    Thematic Network on an Operational Platform for Quality Shipping

2.3.2/4    Thematic Network on movement of goods in urban areas 

2.3.2/5   Mobility management - new partnerships to encourage sustainable travel

2.3.2/6    Travel awareness, communication, education and publicity

 

 

 

 

 


ANNEX

 

LIST OF TASKS

 

2nd CALL. DECEMBER 1999

 

 

 

THESE TASKS ARE NOT OPEN

 


 

LIST OF TASKS

2nd CALL. DECEMBER 1999

Objective 2.1  Socio-economic scenarios for mobility of people and goods

2.1.1       Quantitative tools for decision-making

2.1.1/8   Thematic Network on transalpine crossing

 

2.1.2       Driving forces in transport

2.1.2/4   Cluster on socio-economic impacts of transport investments and policies and network effects

 

2.1.3       Policies for sustainable mobility

2.1.3/2   Implementation of marginal cost pricing in transport

Objective 2.2  Infrastructures and their interfaces with transport means and systems

2.2.1       Infrastructure development and maintenance

2.2.1/10  Improved tools for railway infrastructure capacity and access management

2.2.1/11  Road infrastructure pavement maintenance management

2.2.1/12  Thematic Network on airport activities

 

2.2.2       Environment

2.2.2/6   Use and Integration of New-generation Vehicles and Radically Improved Propulsion Systems in the Transport System

2.2.2/7   Assessment and development of mitigation measures and procedures for environmentally friendly shipping operations

 

2.2.3       Safety

2.2.3/8    Drivers' and Riders' Physical Fitness and Physical State

2.2.3/9    Safety in tunnels

 

2.2.5       Human factors

2.2.5/5   Training concepts for improved cross-border train operations

2.2.5/6   Development of methodologies and performance measures to assess long term safety implications of new in-vehicle technologies including HMI for road transport.

 

Objective 2.3  Modal and intermodal transport management systems

2.3.1       Traffic management systems

2.3.1/11  Thematic Network on Air Transport and ATM Validation activities

2.3.1/12 Assessment of new concepts for ship and shore traffic management and information systems (VTMIS) to improve efficiency in waterborne transport operations

 

2.3.2      Transport and mobility services

2.3.2/7   Innovative intermodal transport solutions for non-unitised cargoes and other specific market segment

2.3.2/8    Integration of air freight transport in the intermodal transport chain

 


ANNEX

 

LIST OF TASKS

 

3rd CALL. JUNE 2000

 

 

 

THESE TASKS ARE NOT OPEN

 


OVERVIEW LIST OF TASKS

3rd CALL. JUNE 2000

Objective 2.1  Socio-economic scenarios for mobility of people and goods

2.1.1       Quantitative tools for decision-making

2.1.1/9   Development of a European Transport policy Information System (ETIS) as a basis for transport planning and policy formulation

2.1.1/10 Designing a database structure for in-depth road accident investigation

 

2.1.2       Driving forces in transport

2.1.2/5    Economic, environmental and social for the sustainable development of transport

2.1.2/6    Implications of non-transport policies and societal developments on mobility

2.1.2/7    European transport visions beyond 2020

2.1.2/8    Potential of intermodal freight transport for modal shift

 

2.1.3       Policies for sustainable mobility

2.1.3/3    Thematic Network on common issues of transport research concerning European and North American Countries 

2.1.3/4    Economic instruments, regulation and physical measures for achieving transport policy objectives

2.1.3/5    Thematic network on local and regional public transport

2.1.3/6    Best practices in decision-taking on local and regional transport schemes

2.1.3/7    Designing local transport policy to integrate freight transport

 

Objective 2.2  Infrastructures and their interfaces with transport means and systems

2.2.1       Infrastructure development and maintenance

2.2.1/13 Improvement of intermodal freight terminal operations at border crossing terminals including CEECs

2.2.1/14 Improvement of intermodal transport operations in terminals

2.2.1/15 Assessment of the availability of intermodal transport means and suitable infrastructure in CEECs to implement co-operation on Trans-European intermodal transport between EU and CEECs

2.2.1/16 Strengthening the interoperability in intermodal transport chains at the level of equipment, infrastructure and transport means

2.2.1/17  Optimising railway network development

2.2.1/18  Road Infrastructure Materials

2.2.1/19  Integration of passenger terminals in intermodal transport networks

2.2.1/20 Arrival/departure/ground movement integration for air transport operations

2.2.1/21  Enhancement of port operations and management to improve Quality Shipping

2.2.1/22 High-speed vessels: identification of requirements and impact assessment

 

2.2.2       Environment

2.2.2/8    Vehicle/tyre/road noise abatement measures

2.2.2/9    Thematic network on the integration of environment in the transport policy

2.2.2/10  Reducing the impact of noise and emissions from land transport in urban areas

2.2.2/11 Assessment of environmentally friendly operations for dangerous goods in ports and other terminals

 

2.2.3       Safety

2.2.3/10  Thematic network on cost/benefit and cost/effectiveness assessment tools for road safety measures

2.2.3/11  Impact assessment of procedures and technologies to increase air transport system capacity and safety, and reduce environmental impact

2.2.3/12  Emergency evacuation of Very Large Transport Aircraft           

2.2.3/13  Increased aircraft passenger survivability through the application of automotive design philosophies

 

2.2.5       Human factors

2.2.5/7   Improved accessibility between station platforms and trains for heavy rail

 

Objective 2.3  Modal and intermodal transport management systems

2.3.1       Traffic management systems

2.3.1/13 Demonstration of an integrated management and communication system for door-to-door intermodal freight transport operations

2.3.1/14 Requirements for urban train control systems

2.3.1/15 Specification and assessment of data collection and communication strategies for road traffic data management and traffic information systems

2.3.1/16 Road speed management methods assessment

2.3.1/17 Operational Platform for a European ATM system in the medium term timeframe (2005 – 2010)

2.3.1/18 Advanced airport approach procedures implementation

2.3.1/19 Operational Platform for River Information Services (RIS)  

 

2.3.2       Transport and mobility services

2.3.2/9   Door-to-door services for less than container load (LCL) and small consignments

2.3.2/10  Fast cargo trains in cross-border traffic

2.3.2/11  Intermediate mass transport: innovative bus/tram concepts

2.3.2/12 Integrated mobility services in low-density rural areas

2.3.2/13 Non technical issues linked to cross-border intermodal traveller information, reservation ant ticketing services complimentary to rail journeys

2.3.2/14 Thematic network on the development of European strategies to promote short sea shipping, sea-river and inland navigation

2.3.2/15 Optimised waterborne operations in support of a European Northern Dimension. Operational Platform

 

 



[1] In close co-operation with the Key Actions City of Tomorrow and Cultural Heritage and Systems and Services for the Citizen.

[2] The rules for implementation of the Fifth Framework Programme and the Competitive and Sustainable Growth Specific Programme must be taken into account. In the relationship with the demonstrators, the European Commission is responsible for contractual matters and for technical and financial project management.

[3] The architecture trade-off, including the technical design of the local components, are part of the DDV project and not part of this task.

[4] MRD Document should be available in a Draft Form as from February 2001. SRD should follow.

[5] Local components will allow users to benefit from precision positioning throughout a city and in areas with poor or no reception of a satellite navigation signal (including in-door) Road and rail transport users and service providers should be enabled to receive GALILEO and integrate the appropriate service in their respective infrastructure.

 

[6] Covered under task 2.3.3/9: Development and optimal use of satellite navigation for all modes of transport (GALILEO)

 

[7] Local components update of MRD, local components update of SRD update. Preparation of a tender dossier to be used as input to the main DDV contract. Date foreseen for initial delivery of these documents is January 2002.

 

[8] Towards a Trans-European Positioning and Navigation Network including a european strategy for GNSS. COM(1998) 29 final

[9] MRD Document should be available in a Draft Form as from February 2001. SRD should follow.

[10] Initial delivery of “assessment documents” having major impact on the Development and Validation phase of GALILEO shall take place in January 2002. Regular results output shall follow.

[11] MRD document should be provided available in Draft Form as from; Mid February 2001. SRD should follow.

[12] From MRD, SRD and from further information elaborated under task 2.3.3/6 “Local Components Definition”.

[13] Under development by the European Space Agency.

[14] Input to task 2.2.3/6 Local Component Definition, by December 2002 at the latest.

[15] [MRD] document should be provided available in a Draft Form as from; Mid February 2001 and then will be updated in June 2001. SRD should followJanuary and appropriate updates will be available

[16] This shall be done in conjunction with the task 11, related to legal, institutional and regulatory issues.

[17] Update of the MRD based on this work should be provided in January 2002.


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 [ck2]

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